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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"This, as has been already observed, is seen only by the eye, or the perceptive faculty of the mind, taking a view of them laid together, in a juxta-position; which view of any two it has equally, whenever they are laid together in any proposition, whether that proposition be placed as a major or...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Tell a country gentlewoman that the wind is south-west, and the weather lowering, and like to rain, and she will easily understand it is not safe for her to go abroad thin clad, in such a day, after a fever: She clearly sees the probable connexion of all these, viz. south-west wind, and clouds, ...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Yet I suspect, I say, that this way of speaking of Faculties has misled many into a confused Notion of so many distinct Agents in us, which had their several Provinces and Authorities, and did command, obey, and perform several Actions, as so many distinct Beings; which has been no small occasio...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Whatever then we talk of innate, either speculative or practical Principles, it may, with as much probability, be said, That a Man hath 100 l. sterling in his Pocket, and yet denied, that he hath there either Penny, Shilling, Crown, or other Coin, out of which the Sum ...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Earthly minds, like mud-walls, resist the strongest batteries: And though perhaps sometimes the force of a clear argument may make some impression, yet they nevertheless stand firm, and keep out the enemy truth, that would captivate or disturb them."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"The present pleasure, if it be not very languid, and almost none at all, fills our narrow souls, and so takes up the whole mind, that it scarce leaves any thought of things absent."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"The relish of the mind is as various as that of the body, and like that too may be altered; and it is a mistake to think, that men cannot change the displeasingness or indifferency that is in actions into pleasure and desire, if they will do but what is in their power."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"At least they interpose themselves so much between our understandings and the truth which it would contemplate and apprehend, that like the medium through which visible objects pass, their obscurity and disorder do not seldom cast a mist before our eyes, and impose upon our understandings."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Passion, interest, inadvertency, mistake of his meaning, and a thousand odd reasons, or capricio's, men's minds are acted by (impossible to be discovered) may make one man quote another man's words or meaning wrong."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"But though we have, here and there, a little of this clear light, some sparks of bright knowledge; yet the greatest part of our ideas are such, that we cannot discern their agreement or disagreement by an immediate comparing them."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.