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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"As it is in the motions of the body, so it is in the thoughts of our minds: Where any one is such, that we have power to take it up, or lay it by, according to the preference of the mind, there we are at liberty"

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"A Man on the Rack, is not at liberty to lay by the Idea of pain, and divert himself with other Contemplations: And sometimes a boisterous Passion hurries our Thoughts, as a Hurricane does our Bodies, without leaving us the liberty of thinking on other things, which we would rather chuse."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"He that has his chains knocked off, and the prison doors set open to him, is perfectly at liberty, because he may either go or stay, as he best likes; though his preference be determined to stay, by the darkness of the night, or illness of the weather, or want of other lodging."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"The mind has a different relish, as well as the palate; and you will as fruitlessly endeavour to delight all men with riches or glory (which yet some men place their happiness in) as you would to satisfy all men's hunger with cheese or lobsters; which, though very agreeable and delicious fare to...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"[W]hereas those innate principles are supposed to be quite of another nature; not coming into the mind by any accidental alterations in, or operations on the body; but, as it were, original characters impressed upon it, in the very first moment of its being and constitution."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Just thus it is with our ideas, which are as it were the pictures of things."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"[N]othing is so unfit to assist the mind in that, as syllogism; which running away with one assumed probability, or one topical argument, pursues that till it has led the mind quite out of sight of the thing under consideration; and forcing it upon some remote difficulty, holds it fast there, in...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"For to apply this Answer with any tolerable Sence to our present Purpose, it must signify one of these two things; either, That as soon as Men come to the use of Reason, these supposed native Inscriptions come to be known, and observed by them; Or else, that the Use and Exercise of Men's Reason,...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"A Man receives a sensible Injury from another, thinks on the Man and that Action over and over; and by ruminating on them strongly, or much in his mind, so cements those two Ideas together, that he makes them almost one."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"A pestle and mortar will as soon bring any particle of matter to indivisibility, as the acutest thought of a mathematician; and a surveyor may as soon with his chain measure out infinite space, as a philosopher by the quickest flight of mind reach it, or by thinking comprehend it; which is to ha...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.