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Date: w. 350 B.C.

"The doctrine of the Pythagoreans seems to rest upon the same ideas; some of them declared the motes in air, others what moved them, to be soul."

— Aristotle (384-322 B.C.)

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Date: 350 B.C.

"Suppose that the eye were an animal--sight would have been its soul, for sight is the substance or essence of the eye which corresponds to the formula, the eye being merely the matter of seeing; when seeing is removed the eye is no longer an eye, except in name"

— Aristotle (384-322 B.C.)

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Date: 350 B.C.

"It is not necessary to ask whether the soul and its body are one, just as we do not ask about wax and its shape."

— Aristotle (384-322 B.C.)

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Date: 350 B.C.

"What it thinks must be in it just as characters may be said to be on a writing-tablet on which as yet nothing actually stands written: this is exactly what happens with mind."

— Aristotle (384-322 B.C.)

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Date: 350 B.C.

"For the body is the soul's tool born with it, a slave is as it were a member or tool of his master, a tool is a sort of inanimate slave."

— Aristotle (384-322 B.C.)

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Date: w. 350 B.C.

"Generally, about all perception, we can say that a sense is what has the power of receiving into itself the sensible forms of things without the matter, in the way in which a piece of wax takes on the impress of a signet-ring without the iron or gold; what produces the impression is a signet of ...

— Aristotle (384-322 B.C.)

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Date: w. 350 B.C.

"The process of movement stamps in, as it were, a sort of impression of the percept, just as persons do who make an impression with a seal."

— Aristotle (384-322 B.C.)

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Date: w. 350 B.C.

"This explains why, in those who are strongly moved owing to passion, or time of life, no memory is formed; just as no impression would be formed if the movement of the seal were to impinge on running water; while there are others in whom, owing to the receiving surface being frayed, as happens t...

— Aristotle (384-322 B.C.)

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Date: w. 350 B.C.

"The former are too moist, the latter too hard, so that in the case of the former the image does not remain in the soul, while on the latter it is not imprinted at all."

— Aristotle (384-322 B.C.)

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Date: c. 300 B.C.

"The sage's heart-mind in stillness is the mirror of Heaven and earth, the glass of the ten thousand things."

— Zhuangzi (4th century BC)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.