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Date: 1842

In memory one may see the "nameless graces" of a friend's "polish'd mind"

— Blamire, Susanna (1747-1794)

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Date: 1842

"Absence cannot guard the cell / Where wayward thoughts are doom'd to dwell"

— Blamire, Susanna (1747-1794)

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Date: 1842

"And ere the sentence left its hallow'd cave, / Would tell what thought was venturing next abroad. / Nor had Disguise in all her face or soul / One place to hide her poor and artful head; / Truth and her train had tenanted each cell, / And honest Friendship at the portal stood / To point or tell ...

— Blamire, Susanna (1747-1794)

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Date: 1842

"[I]mages / Hurrying so swiftly their fresh witcheries / O'er the mind's mirror, that the several / Seems lost, or blended in the mighty All."

— De Vere, Sir Aubrey (1788-1846)

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Date: 1842

"The images of past delight / Have fleeted from her troubled sight, / And left no perfect form behind / On the dim mirror of the mind"

— Herbert, William (1778-1847)

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Date: 1842

"Strengthened by Him, not all / The blandishment of Passion shall obscure / The mirror of the soul"

— De Vere, Sir Aubrey (1788-1846)

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Date: 1842

A "thought of shame" may "Bedim the mental eye with film impure"

— De Vere, Sir Aubrey (1788-1846)

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Date: 1842

"The heart retires within her cave, / And, bleeding, asks an early grave!"

— Blamire, Susanna (1747-1794)

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Date: 1842

"Think'st thou fond memory will not bear / Thy image through the drowning tear? / The mind's eye then shall take the place, / And wander o'er thy much lov'd face."

— Blamire, Susanna (1747-1794)

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Date: w. 1795-1796, first published 1842

"In these my lonely wanderings I perceived / What mighty objects do impress their forms / To elevate our intellectual being."

— Wordsworth, William (1770-1850)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.