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Date: 1928, 1978

"Only the copied text thus commands the soul of him who is occupied with it, whereas the mere reader never discovers the new aspects of his inner self that are opened by the text, that road cut through the interior jungle forever closing behind it: because the reader follows the movement of his m...

— Benjamin, Walter (1892-1940)

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Date: 1929

"And Shelley had his towers, thought's crowned powers he called them once."

— Yeats, W. B. (1865-1939)

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Date: 1929

"Goldsmith deliberately sipping at the honey-pot of his mind."

— Yeats, W. B. (1865-1939)

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Date: 1929

"Such fullness in that quarter overflows / And falls into the basin of the mind / That man is stricken deaf and dumb and blind, / For intellect no longer knows / Is from the Ought, or Knower from the Known."

— Yeats, W. B. (1865-1939)

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Date: w. c. 1864, published 1929

"Experience is the Angled Road / Preferred against the Mind / By -- Paradox -- the Mind itself -- / Presuming it to lead."

— Dickinson, Emily (1830-1886)

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Date: November, 1930

"What's in your mind, my dove, my coney; / Do thoughts grow like feathers, the dead end of life; / Is it making of love or counting of money, / Or raid on the jewels, the plans of a thief?"

— Auden, W. H. (1907-1973)

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Date: 1931

"My Waxen heart, when near the Flame, / Yields to th' imprinted mould" but "hardens in the Cold"

— Tickell, Thomas (1685-1740)

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Date: 1931

"As you remember I am a great one for mugginess--of air, mind or imagery."

— Tuve, Rosemund (1903-1964)

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Date: 1932

"A tiny core of stillness in the heart is like the eye of a violet."

— Lawrence, D. H. (1885-1930)

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Date: 1932

"The climate of the mind is positively English in its variableness and instability."

— Huxley, Aldous (1894-1963)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.