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Date: 1762

"It is accordingly observed by Longinus, in his treatise of the Sublime, that the proper time for metaphor, is when the passions are so swelled as to hurry on like a torrent."

— Home, Henry, Lord Kames (1696-1782)

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Date: 1762

"The mind falls with a heavy body, descends with a river, and ascends with flame and smoke."

— Home, Henry, Lord Kames (1696-1782)

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Date: 1762

"This vibration of the mind in passing and repassing betwixt things that are related, explains the facts above mentioned."

— Home, Henry, Lord Kames (1696-1782)

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Date: 1762

"The same object makes not always the same impression; because the mind, being of a limited capacity, cannot, at the same instant, give great attention to a plurality of objects."

— Home, Henry, Lord Kames (1696-1782)

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Date: 1762

"In the same manner, good news arriving to a man labouring under distress, occasions a vibration in his mind from the one to the other."

— Home, Henry, Lord Kames (1696-1782)

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Date: 1762

"This is verified by experience; from which we learn, that different passions having the same end in view, impel the mind to action with united force. The mind receives not impulses alternately from these passions, but one strong impulse from the whole in conjunction."

— Home, Henry, Lord Kames (1696-1782)

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Date: 1762

"Ovid paints in lively colours the vibration of mind betwixt two opposite passions directed upon the same object."

— Home, Henry, Lord Kames (1696-1782)

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Date: 1762

"But as resentment when so outrageous is contrary to conscience, the mind, to justify its passion as well as to gratify it, is disposed to paint these relations in the blackest colours; and it actually comes to be convinced, that they ought to be punished for their own demerits."

— Home, Henry, Lord Kames (1696-1782)

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Date: 1762

"These emotions tending strongly to their own gratification, impose upon a weak mind, and impress upon it a thorough conviction contrary to all sense and reason."

— Home, Henry, Lord Kames (1696-1782)

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Date: 1762

"The like false reckoning of time may proceed from an opposite state of mind. In a reverie, where ideas float at random without making any impression, time goes on unheeded and the reckoning is lost."

— Home, Henry, Lord Kames (1696-1782)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.