page 13 of 287     per page:
sorted by:

Date: 1691

"This made my Heart dance the Canaries in my Breast without the help of a Violin."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

preview | full record

Date: 1691

"So that here by a dear-bought Experience, I found, that the wandering Fancy of Man (nay, that even Life it self) is a it were but a meer Ramble or Fegary after the drag of something that doth itchifie our Senses, which when we have hunted home, we find nothing but a meer delusion."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

preview | full record

Date: 1692

"I tell you, Madam, Love in my Breast is with greater difficulty remov'd, than Foreign Aids out of the distressed Kingdom they are call'd in to assist; Love has subdued me all, and I am entirely a Slave."

— Gildon, Charles (1665-1724)

preview | full record

Date: 1692

"But if such a one carries some weakness along with him, we find his Indisposition augmented, by the time he has there, to reflect upon it, and to humour it by those pleasing Idea's, which smite the Imagination so much the more dangerously, the more they represent the delightful Objects, the loss...

— Anonymous

preview | full record

Date: 1692

"A Discourse so little expected, at a time when Asteria might, with so much probability, have thought that she only was possess'd of Tazander's Heart, coming to undeceive her to her shame, her Mind became immediately the Stage of whatever could be most Afflictive and Cruel, in an emergency so sur...

— Anonymous

preview | full record

Date: 1692

"And therefore, to gain, by Flattery, the Soveraignty of a Heart, which her other Artifices had not been able to subdue; O Tazander! Cry'd she, after she had continu'd a while in silence, O generous Tazander! How much do I admire your constancy!"

— Anonymous

preview | full record

Date: 1692

"That Raillery, Madam, reply'd Eurimantes, does not suit with the posture my Soul is in at present."

— Anonymous

preview | full record

Date: 1692

"And when ever there occurr'd to his Memory any Action of Asteria's, wherein he was satisfi'd of her Love towards him, he found his thoughts more and more inclining to her; nay so far had he receded from his former Sentiments, that looking on all she had done against him, as so many Marks of a Pa...

— Anonymous

preview | full record

Date: Licens'd Decemb. 22. 1691

"And with reverence be it spoken, and the Parallel kept at due distance, there is something of equality in the Proportion which they bear in reference to one another, with that between Comedy and Tragedy; but the Drama is the long extracted from Romance and History: 'tis the Midwife to Industry, ...

— Congreve, William (1670-1729)

preview | full record

Date: Licens'd Decemb. 22. 1691

"Madam, it is no small demonstration of the entire Resignation which I have made of my Heart to your Chains, since the secrets of it are no longer in my power."

— Congreve, William (1670-1729)

preview | full record

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.