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Date: 1691

"Hunger will caper over stone Walls, I might add, over Hills set upon Hills, and therefore did I chuse in Affliction rather to make my Brains my Exchequer, than (like a Modest Gentleman) to groan under the Slavery of a Blushing Temper."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"Philaret and I being thus agreed on a Rambling Project, you shall now seldom see us two asunder: We dwell together like Soul and Body"

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"In the Chimney lies one whistling, another gaping, another swearing and cursing, and all of them in such a Tempest of Imagination, that had not the Master of the House interpos'd his Authority, and seasonably assum'd the Office of Master of the supposed Pinnace, commanding all hands down in the ...

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"As for the Loves of these Villagers, the Intriegues of their Amours are not a little remarkable, they being very pretty Animals when disguis'd with that Passion: They are Tinder to such Flames, being quickly set on fire, even by the least spark, which when it hath catch'd the Match of their Soul...

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"Observe again, how greedily their Souls, keeping Sentinel in their Ears, lye and catch for words; and how their Souls, in a perpetual emanation gliding from their Eyes, waste themselves in passionate Glances, and suffer many a faint Swoon with gazing."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"I confess my Mind (the nobler part of me) now and then takes a walk in the large Campaign of Heaven, and there I contemplate the Universe, the Mysterious Concatenation of Causes, and the stupendious Efforts of the Almighty, in consideration whereof I can chearfully bid adieu to the World."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"The Peasant and the Crowned Head, / The same dark Path must tread, / And in the same cold Earth both undistinguisht lie; / (Whilest the sad Soul her Voyage takes / Through gloomy Fens, and Stygian Lakes, / Unable to procure a longer stay, / Into Eternal Exile sails away.)"

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"Sometimes he describ'd the Humors of the Greenwich Usurers, who, as he exprest it, had Hearts of Marble and Entrals of Brass."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"Let none hereafter dare to blame / The Gods, for making Cupid blind / Lest his offence he plagu'd with shame / And all Mens hate, besiege his mind."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"I made answer thus; Because she was made of Adam's Flesh when he was asleep; secondly, she was made of his Rib, the Rib lies near to the Heart, the Heart is Master of Thoughts, and Thoughts beget Words."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.