page 10 of 502     per page:
sorted by:

Date: 58

"As we hunt wild beasts with toil and peril, and even when they are caught find them an anxious possession, for they often tear their keepers to pieces, even so are great pleasures: they turn out to be great evils and take their owners prisoner."

— Seneca, Lucius Annaeus (c. 4 B.C. - A.D. 65)

preview | full record

Date: w. c. 63 A.D.

"Moreover, we ought not to allow our desires to wander far afield, but we must make them confine themselves to our immediate neighbourhood, since they will not endure to be altogether locked up."

— Seneca, Lucius Annaeus (c. 4 B.C. - A.D. 65)

preview | full record

Date: c. 65 A.D.

"He is the true freeman who has escaped from bondage to self. That slavery is constant, from it there is no deliverance."

— Seneca, Lucius Annaeus (c. 4 B.C. - A.D. 65)

preview | full record

Date: 97

"Let us contemplate Him with our understanding, and look with the eyes of our soul to His long-suffering will"

— St. Clement (30-100)

preview | full record

Date: 100

"On this [the soul] he inscribes each one of his conceptions. The first method of inscription is through the senses."

— Aetius (c. 100 A.D.)

preview | full record

Date: 100

"When a man is born, the Stoics say, he has the commanding part of his soul like a sheet of paper ready for writing upon."

— Aetius (c. 100 A.D.)

preview | full record

Date: 101

"You may fetter my leg, but my will not even Zeus himself can overpower."

— Epictetus (c. 55-c.135)

preview | full record

Date: 101

"Because the gods have given the vine, or wheat, we sacrifice to them: but because they have produced in the human mind that fruit by which they designed to show us the truth which relates to happiness, shall we not thank God for this?"

— Epictetus (c. 55-c.135)

preview | full record

Date: 101

"I indeed think that the old man ought to be sitting here, not to contrive how you may have no mean thoughts nor mean and ignoble talk about yourselves, but to take care that there be not among us any young men of such a mind that, when they have recognized their kinship to God, and that we are f...

— Epictetus (c. 55-c.135)

preview | full record

Date: 1655

"Therefore it belongs to the will as to the Generall of an Army to moove the other powers of the soul to their acts, and among the rest the understanding also, by applying it and reducing its power into act."

— Bramhall, John (1594-1663)

preview | full record

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.