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Date: 1665

"The like frailties are to be found in the Memory; we often let many things slip away from us, which deserve to be retain'd; and of those which we treasure up, a great part is either frivolous or false; and if good, and substantial, either in tract of time obliterated, or at best so overwhelmed a...

— Hooke, Robert (1635-1703)

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Date: 1665

"Thus all the uncertainty, and mistakes of humane actions, proceed either from the narrowness and wandring of our Senses, from the slipperiness or delusion of our Memory, from the confinement or rashness of our Understanding, so that 'tis no wonder, that our power over natural causes and effects ...

— Hooke, Robert (1635-1703)

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Date: 1665

"The Understanding is to order all the inferiour services of the lower Faculties; but yet it is to do this only as a lawful Master, and not as a Tyrant."

— Hooke, Robert (1635-1703)

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Date: 1665

The understanding "must examine, range, and dispose of the bank which is laid up in the Memory; but it must be sure to make distinction between the sober and well collected heap, and the extravagant Idea's, and mistaken Images, which there it may sometimes light upon."

— Hooke, Robert (1635-1703)

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Date: 1666

"The composition of all poems is or ought to be of wit, and wit in the poet, or wit writing (if you will give me leave to use a school distinction), is no other than the faculty of imagination in the writer, which, like a nimble spaniel, beats over and ranges through the field of memory, till it ...

— Dryden, John (1631-1700)

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Date: 1666

Elocution is " that art of clothing and adorning that thought so found and varied, in apt, significant, and sounding word."

— Dryden, John (1631-1700)

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Date: 1667

"For, though Man's Soul, and Body are not onely one natural Engine (as some have thought) of whose motions of all sorts, there may be as certain an accompt given, as those of a Watch or a Clock"

— Sprat, Thomas (bap. 1635, d. 1713)

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Date: 1667

"But to do this always, and never be able to write a line without it, though it may be admired by some few pedants, will not pass upon those who know that wit is best conveyed to us in the most easy language; and is most to be admired when a great thought comes dressed in words so commonly receiv...

— Dryden, John (1631-1700)

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Date: 1667, 1710

"The Mind of Man is his Eye, by which he is to behold God; now if this Eye be blind, if the Light be Darkness, how great is that Darkness!"

— Janeway, James (1636?-1674)

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Date: 1667, 1710

"If we are not acquainted with God, our Souls serve us to little purpose: It is a causing the Prince, the Soul, to go on Foot, and to serve the Body, which should be as a Servant; it is to let the Candle of the Lord burn out in waste."

— Janeway, James (1636?-1674)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.