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Date: 1927

"The way in which the self is unveiled to itself in the factical Dasein can nevertheless be fittingly called reflection, except that we must not take this expression to mean what is commonly meant by it--the ego bent around backward and staring at itself--but an interconnection such as is manifes...

— Heidegger, Martin (1889-1976)

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Date: 1928, 1978

"Only the copied text thus commands the soul of him who is occupied with it, whereas the mere reader never discovers the new aspects of his inner self that are opened by the text, that road cut through the interior jungle forever closing behind it: because the reader follows the movement of his m...

— Benjamin, Walter (1892-1940)

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Date: 1932

"The climate of the mind is positively English in its variableness and instability."

— Huxley, Aldous (1894-1963)

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Date: 1932

"Herbert is the poet of this inner weather."

— Huxley, Aldous (1894-1963)

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Date: 1935

"Not I, to whom the scraggly, unpruned emotions of many modern poets seem almost indecenly luxurious."

— North, Jessica Nelson (1891-1988)

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Date: 1936

"Everything is sordid, shoddy, thin as pasteboard. A Coney Island of the mind."

— Miller, Henry (1891-1980)

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Date: 1936

"The monarch of the mind is a monkey wrench."

— Miller, Henry (1891-1980)

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Date: 1937

"They are gadget-minded. If they see a thing that needs to be done, they rig up a device, mechanical or mental, and make the thing do itself with no further bother."

— Newton, Joseph Fort (1876-1950)

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Date: 1937

"My hat is off to the gadget mind."

— Newton, Joseph Fort (1876-1950)

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Date: 1937

"But, my friend goes on to say, there are some fields in which the gadget mind will not work; and here he gets under our skin a bit."

— Newton, Joseph Fort (1876-1950)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.