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Date: Monday, December 3, 1711

"First we flatter ourselves, and then the Flattery of others is sure of Success. It awakens our Self-Love within, a Party which is ever ready to revolt from our better Judgment, and join the Enemy without."

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

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Date: Thursday, July 3rd, 1712

"When the Brain is hurt by Accident, or the mind disordered by Dreams or Sickness, the Fancy is over-run with wild dismal Ideas, and terrified with a thousand hideous Monsters of its own framing."

— Addison, Joseph (1672-1719)

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Date: Wednesday, June 18, 1712

"In the same manner is the Mind assisted or endangered by the Passions; Reason must then take the Place of Pilot, and can never fail of securing her Charge if she be not wanting to her self."

— Anonymous

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Date: Tuesday, January 15, 1712

"The Pineal Gland, which many of our Modern Philosophers suppose to be the Seat of the Soul, smelt very strong of Essence and Orange-flower Water, and was encompassed with a kind of Horny Substance, cut into a thousand little Faces or Mirrours, which were imperceptible to the naked Eye, insomuch ...

— Addison, Joseph (1672-1719)

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Date: Saturday, June 28, 1712

"By this means they awaken other Ideas of the same Sett, which immediately determine a new Dispatch of Spirits, that in the same manner open other Neighbouring Traces, till at last the whole Sett of them is blown up, and the whole Prospect or Garden flourishes in the Imagination."

— Addison, Joseph (1672-1719)

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Date: 1713

"Your soul (continued he) being at liberty to transport herself with a thought wherever she pleases, may enter into the Pineal Gland of the most learned philosopher, and, being so placed, become spectator of all the ideas in his mind, which would instruct her in a much less time than the usual me...

— Berkeley, George (1685-1753)

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Date: April 13, 1715

"Then do ten Thousand Ideas crowd into my Brain, and offer me Subjects for eternal Imprecations; and 'tis Forty to One if I don't begin and rant tragically to my self in some of Lee's or Otway's Elegancies."

— Theobald, Lewis (1688-1744)

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Date: 1715

"Speech was given to Man as the Image and Interpreter of the Soul: It is anime index & speculum, the Messenger of the Heart, the Gate by which all that is within issues forth, and comes into open View."

— Bulstrode, Richard, Sir (1610-1711)

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Date: 1716

"Joyn Sense and Reason, and Experiment unto Speculation, and so give life unto Embryon Truths, and Verities yet in their Chaos"

— Browne, Sir Thomas (1605-1682)

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Date: 1720

"For as in the Body Politick, the Prince, (whom Seneca calls the Soul of the Commonwealth.) receiveth no Passages of State, or false Ones, where there is Negligence, or Disability in those subjectate Inquirers, (whom Xenophon terms the Eyes and Ears of Kings.) In like Manner the Soul of Man being...

— Hales, John (1584-1656)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.