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Date: 1691

"'Tis true, my Master did advise me (for which I'll pay and ever owe him as many Thanks as Arithmetick can count) to beg my Father's Consent before I rambled again; but my runnagate Mind being set on a galloping Frollick, he might with as much ease have found out the Quadrature of a Circle, or th...

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"And when abroad I go, Fancy shall be / My skilful Coachman, and shall hurry me / Through Heaven and Earth, and Neptune's watery Plain, / And in a moment drive me back again."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"Oh the Oceans of Delight that now flow'd within me!"

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"Nature returns, and now tho Business had fetter'd my Leggs, and my whole Life seem'd but as one Marriage-day, (such crouching was there now to the Rising Sun;) yet all this could not fix my little Carkass, or limit my roving Mind to a narrower Circuit than the whole Creation."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"Observe again, how greedily their Souls, keeping Sentinel in their Ears, lye and catch for words; and how their Souls, in a perpetual emanation gliding from their Eyes, waste themselves in passionate Glances, and suffer many a faint Swoon with gazing."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"I confess my Mind (the nobler part of me) now and then takes a walk in the large Campaign of Heaven, and there I contemplate the Universe, the Mysterious Concatenation of Causes, and the stupendious Efforts of the Almighty, in consideration whereof I can chearfully bid adieu to the World."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"The Peasant and the Crowned Head, / The same dark Path must tread, / And in the same cold Earth both undistinguisht lie; / (Whilest the sad Soul her Voyage takes / Through gloomy Fens, and Stygian Lakes, / Unable to procure a longer stay, / Into Eternal Exile sails away.)"

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"This made my Heart dance the Canaries in my Breast without the help of a Violin."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"So that here by a dear-bought Experience, I found, that the wandering Fancy of Man (nay, that even Life it self) is a it were but a meer Ramble or Fegary after the drag of something that doth itchifie our Senses, which when we have hunted home, we find nothing but a meer delusion."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

The Soul's a Particle of Heavenly fire, / And boldly doth to every thing aspire: / But yet how low Her lofty Flights do fall; / When She attempts the Wonders of this Ball!"

— Heyrick, Thomas (bap. 1649. d. 1694)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.