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Date: 1686, 1712

"When first my Soul put on its fleshly Load, / It was Imprison'd in the dark Abode; / My Feet were Fetters, my Hands Manacles, / My Sinews Chains, and all Confinement else; / My Bones the Bars of my loath'd Prison grate; / My Tongue the Turn-key, and my Mouth the Gate."

— Arwaker, Edmund (c.1655-1730)

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Date: 1686, 1712

"O! that some usual Labour were injoyn'd, / And not the Tyrant Vice enslav'd my mind! / No weight of Chains cou'd grieve my captive Hands, / Like the loath'd Drudg'ry of its base Commands."

— Arwaker, Edmund (c.1655-1730)

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Date: 1687

"And Monarch's can depose, or can create: / With secret Chains their Subjects Conscience binds, / And lays inchanted Fetters on their Minds."

— Heyrick, Thomas (bap. 1649. d. 1694)

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Date: 1689

And yet there is, there is one prize / Lock'd in an adamantine Breast; / Storm that then, Love, if thou be'st wise, / A Conquest above all the rest, / Her Heart, who binds all Hearts in chains, / Castanna's Heart untouch'd remains."

— Cotton, Charles (1630-1687)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"He that has his chains knocked off, and the prison doors set open to him, is perfectly at liberty, because he may either go or stay, as he best likes; though his preference be determined to stay, by the darkness of the night, or illness of the weather, or want of other lodging."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"[N]othing is so unfit to assist the mind in that, as syllogism; which running away with one assumed probability, or one topical argument, pursues that till it has led the mind quite out of sight of the thing under consideration; and forcing it upon some remote difficulty, holds it fast there, in...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Tell a country gentlewoman that the wind is south-west, and the weather lowering, and like to rain, and she will easily understand it is not safe for her to go abroad thin clad, in such a day, after a fever: She clearly sees the probable connexion of all these, viz. south-west wind, and clouds, ...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1691

"Grace doth our Souls to God unite, / Like glorious Golden Chains."

— Keach, Benjamin (1640-1704)

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Date: 1691

"By Law and Inclination doubly joyn'd, / Both acted by one Sympathetick Mind. / Whom Wedlock's Silken Chains as softly tye, / As that which when asunder snapt, we dye, / Which makes the Soul and Body's wondrous harmony."

— Ames, Richard (bap. 1664?, d. 1692)

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Date: 1691

"Here wisely-flowing Eloquence disdains / To be confin'd, but in Poetick Chains: / Sweet are the Bonds, that tye the Soul to Sense / And scope allow for All things, but Offence!"

— Heyrick, Thomas (bap. 1649. d. 1694)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.