page 43 of 45     per page:
sorted by:

Date: 1815

"You bid me write to amuse the tedious hours, / And save from withering my poetic powers; / Hard is the task, my friend, for verse should flow / From the free mind, not fetter'd down by woe."

— Cowper, William (1731-1800)

preview | full record

Date: 1816

"Nor wide stretched lands, nor interposing deep, / Can check the progess of th’ unfetter’d soul."

— Carter, Elizabeth (1717-1806)

preview | full record

Date: November 12, 1816

"But what land, that poet ever sung, or enchanter swayed, can equal that, which, when the slave's foot touches, he becomes free--his prisoned soul starts forth, his swelling nerves burst the chain that enthrall'd him, and, in his own strength he stands, as the rock he treads on, majestic and secu...

— Morton, Thomas (1764-1838)

preview | full record

Date: 1817

"On this scroll thou seest written in characters fair / A sun-beamy tale of a wreath, and a chain; / And, warrior, it nurtures the property rare / Of charming my mind from the trammels of pain."

— Keats, John (1795-1821)

preview | full record

Date: February, 1821

"Standard productions of this kind are links in the chain of our conscious being. They bind together the different scattered divisions of our personal identity."

— Hazlitt, William (1778-1830)

preview | full record

Date: 1825

"This hallowed day, in Hymen's golden bands / Which joined consenting hearts and willing hands."

— Barbauld, Anna Letitia [née Aikin] (1743-1825)

preview | full record

Date: w. c. 1789, published 1825

"Dost thou not see,--or art thou blind with age,-- / How many Graces on her eyelids sit, / Linking those viewless chains that bind the soul, / And sharpening smooth discourse with pointed wit."

— Barbauld, Anna Letitia [née Aikin] (1743-1825)

preview | full record

Date: January 9, 1827

"Lady Stanmore will never know the value of domestic happiness till she has lost it: she will then find that female domination is wretched slavery; and that the silken tie--the silver links that chain the heart of woman to a worthy husband, is her noblest ornament--her crown of triumph."

— Morton, Thomas (1764-1838)

preview | full record

Date: 1829

"Death is only the removal of an immortal soul from dead matter, which many have considered merely as a clog to the soul."

— Balfour, Walter (1776-1852)

preview | full record

Date: 1842

"Regret came shivering through my veins, / And bound my tongue in iron chains; / My soul in prison seem'd to be / And ever must if torn from thee."

— Blamire, Susanna (1747-1794)

preview | full record

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.