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Date: 1615

"But by spirits we understand the primary and immediate instrument of the soul, which the Stoicks calleth 'the Band which tyeth the soul and the body.'"

— Crooke, Helkiah (1576-1648)

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Date: 1624, 1628

"Heu dolor! caveae membra fuere meae. / Pes compes, manicaeque manus, nervique catenae, / Ossaque cancellis nativa repagula claustri, / Damner ut hospitii compede vincta mei?" ["Alas, what misery! that the light poured me forth on these unhappy airs! My very limbs are a prison to me. Feet fetters...

— Hugo, Herman (1588-1629)

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Date: 1629

"Doth not this shew vnto vs, that  the body is but to the soule as a clogge tied to the legge."

— Cole, James (fl. 1629)

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Date: 1651

"'Tis but the Body that blind Fortunes spight / Can chain to Earth; the nobler Soul doth slight / Her servill Bonds, and takes to Heaven her flight."

— Sherburne, Sir Edward (bap. 1616, d. 1702)

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Date: 1651

"Why break'st thou not (my Soul) this Chain / Of Flesh? why lett'st thou that restrain / Thy nimble Flight into his Arms, / Whose only Look with gladness charms?"

— Sherburne, Sir Edward (bap. 1616, d. 1702)

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Date: 1652

"I speak now in relation between the Oppressor and the oppressed; the inward bondages I meddle not with in this place, though I am assured that, if it be rightly searched into, the inward bondages of the mind, as covetousness, pride, hypocrisy, envy, sorrow, fears, desperation and madness, are al...

— Winstanley, Gerrard (bap. 1609, d. 1676)

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Date: 1652

"Ne're tell us that you wanted origanical dispositions, for you plainly have recourse to the sensitive powers, and must needs subscribe to this, that al knowledg comes flourishing in at these lattices. Why else should not your Candle enlighten you before? who was it that chained up; and fettered ...

— Culverwell, Nathanael (bap. 1619, d. 1651)

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Date: 1661

"Such were Love's Ardors, he could scarce forbear / His fettering flesh, his free Soul's chaines, to tear."

— Pordage, Samuel (bap. 1633, d. c. 1691)

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Date: 1664

"They are moved (if I may dare to say so) like the rational creatures of the Almighty Poet, who walk at liberty, in their own opinion, because their fetters are invisible; when, indeed, the prison of their will is the more sure for being large; and instead of an absolute power over their actions,...

— Dryden, John (1631-1700)

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Date: 1664

"Come! let thy locks (whose every Hair / A willing Lover doth ensnare) / Fetter my Soul, in those soft Chaines, / Where Beauty link't with Love, remains!"

— Bold, Henry (1627-1683)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.