page 3 of 4     per page:
sorted by:

Date: 1713, 1719

"For in our Youth we commonly dress our Thoughts in the Mirrour of Self-Flattery, and expect that Heaven, Fortune, and the World, should cajole our Follies, as we do our own, and lay all Faults on others, and all Praise on our selves."

— Barker, Jane (1675-1743)

preview | full record

Date: 1720

"Severity makes more Hypocrites than any Sort of Discipline; streight lacing the Body may make us good Shapes, but there's no streight lacing our Minds."

— Shadwell, Charles (fl. 1692-1720)

preview | full record

Date: April 18, 1721

"If, after Death, our Forms (as some believe) / Shall be transparent, naked every Thought, / And Friends meet Friends, and read each other's Hearts, / Thou'lt know one day, that thou wast held most dear. / Farewel."

— Young, Edward (bap. 1683, d. 1765)

preview | full record

Date: 1722

"I met her this morning in a new manteau and petticoat, not a bit worse for her lady's wearing, and she has always new thoughts and new airs with new clothes."

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

preview | full record

Date: Friday, April 17. 1724

"Their Imaginations are thin, and delicate; and play lightly on the Skirts of Objects: But they are too weak for solid Reasoning; and, in any Thing abstracted, and above the Pitch of the Senses, they are miserably Impotent, and grow presently weary."

— Hill, Aaron (1685-1750)

preview | full record

Date: 1724

"In short, every thing we do, you construe to your own advantage: if we look easy and pleas'd in your Company, we are certainly in Love; if grave and reserv'd, 'tis to hide our Love; thus you all imagine we are fond of gaining a Conquest over a Heart, which when we have got it, is perhaps so very...

— Davys, Mary (1674-1732)

preview | full record

Date: 1729

"Then the good easy man, whom reason rules; / Rouz'd by bold insult, and injurious rage, / With sharp, and sudden check, th' astonish'd sons / Of violence confounds; firm as his cause, / His bolder heart; in awful justice clad; / His eyes effulging a peculiar fire: / And, as he charges thro' the ...

— Thomson, James (1700-1748)

preview | full record

Date: 1737

"So many things freely thrown out, such lengths of unreserv'd friendship, thoughts just warm from the brain, without any polishing or dress, the very dishabille of the understanding."

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

preview | full record

Date: w. 1737, published 1738

"But when no Prelate's Lawn with Hair-shirt lin'd, / Is half so incoherent as my Mind, / When (each Opinion with the next at strife, / One ebb and flow of follies all my Life) / I plant, root up, I build, and then confound, / Turn round to square, and square again to round."

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

preview | full record

Date: 1739

"O I will / Of private Passions all my Soul divest, / And take my dearer Country to my Breast."

— Brooke, Henry (c. 1703-1783)

preview | full record

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.