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Date: 1691

"Can it be a Fault to chuse a better for a worse, and don't all the thinking World agree that this state we are now in, is but a Slavery to sence, a bondage to dull matter, which tedders us down like our Brother Brutes, where we are not only exposed to want and misery, but to all the Insults and ...

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"My Body a pick-pack on my Soul, / Rambles to view the spangl'd Pole, / Rambles a round to search my Dear, / Unwearied Walks from Sphere to Sphere, / Knocks at each door, and asks--Is Rachel here?"

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"And shou'd an Evangelist, with an Angel at his Elbow, have told me that Goddess of my Soul had so much as one speck of Deformity, one single Mole, either in Body or Mind, I shou'd have said--By your leave, Mr. Evangelist,--I must suspend my Faith."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"To be short, thus I continued Loving upon the stretch without fear or wit, so long till I had forgot my self and every thing else, till I found my Mind as much disfigured with that feaverish disease, as my Face with the Small-pox,--and to lose--such a Face, and such a Mind--"

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"Philaret and I being thus agreed on a Rambling Project, you shall now seldom see us two asunder: We dwell together like Soul and Body"

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"So that here by a dear-bought Experience, I found, that the wandering Fancy of Man (nay, that even Life it self) is a it were but a meer Ramble or Fegary after the drag of something that doth itchifie our Senses, which when we have hunted home, we find nothing but a meer delusion."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1692

"At Distance thro' an artful Glass / To the Mind's Eye Things well appear."

— Prior, Matthew (1664-1721)

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Date: 1692

"He has clearly overthrown all those Metaphysical Whymsies, which infected mens Brains with a Spice of Madness, whereby they feign'd a Knowledge where they had none, by making a noise with Sounds, without clear and distinct Significations."

— Molyneux, William (1656-1698)

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Date: 1692

"Gold first their Blindfold Reason led astray"

— Ward, Edward (1667-1731)

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Date: 1692

"Abandon'd to a callousness and numness of soul"

— Bentley, Richard (1662-1742)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.