page 8 of 24     per page:
sorted by:

Date: 1691

"Trade is the very Life and Soul of the Universe, which, like the Vital Blood in the Body, Circulates to the Health, and well-being of the whole, and when by the failure of Industry, there is a stop put to Commerce, it often proves as fatal to the Body Politick, as the stagnating of the Blood doe...

— Blount, Thomas Pope, Sir (1649-1697)

preview | full record

Date: 1691

"Now Reading may very properly be compar'd to Eating, and Thinking to Digesting, as therefore to one Hours Eating, we allow many hours for Digesting; so to one hours Reading, we should assign Sufficient time for Meditating, and Digesting, what we have Read."

— Blount, Thomas Pope, Sir (1649-1697)

preview | full record

Date: 1691

"So the other be of no less Prejudice to the understanding, by occasioning Diseases of the Mind."

— Blount, Thomas Pope, Sir (1649-1697)

preview | full record

Date: 1691

"Thoughts are our Plagues; the Beasts, that none do know, / Are Free from trouble and resentment too."

— Heyrick, Thomas (bap. 1649. d. 1694)

preview | full record

Date: 1691

"However chast his Body may be, his Mind is extreamly prolifick; his thoughts are a perfect Seraglio, and he, like a great Turk, begets thousands of little Infants--Remarks, Fancys, Fantasticks, Crochets and Whirligigs, on his wandring Intellect, and when once begot, they must be bred--so out he ...

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

preview | full record

Date: 1691

"But again I won't forestall ye, tho' really the matter presses, and my pregnant Brain labours with so many painful pangs to be obstetricated, that I verily fear I shall burst before I come to disgorge it thro' my fruitful Quill, to avoid which I'll Ramble on as fast as I can scamper thro' this P...

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

preview | full record

Date: 1691

"As for the pretty little Virtues of Comity and Urbanity, this furnishes you to a miracle, for have you a mind to divert either your self or Friend with the most pleasant and agreeable entertainment, a Mans Jaws must be made of Iron, and fastn'd as close to one another, as if 'twere done with the...

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

preview | full record

Date: 1691

"I say I've but one little tiney favour to beg, and then--and that is--that he'd maturely Weigh, Swallow, Chew the Cud, and soundly digest this following first Book, before he throw it out agen, for should he make too much hast, and too greedily read it over, as 'tis to be fear'd the pleasantness...

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

preview | full record

Date: 1691

"Here cou'd I easily step over, with the Feet of my Fancy (wider then ten thousand Colossus's, though one of them be big enough for a Ship to Sail between its Legs) to all the Spires in London."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

preview | full record

Date: 1691

"My Body is no better than the Legs, and Arms, or rather Crutches of my Soul--Why shou'd it be a Crime to throw those Crutches away and go alone, especially when they are troublesom or rotten?"

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

preview | full record

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.