page 7 of 11     per page:
sorted by:

Date: 1710

"Now, thought is to the mind what motion is to the body; both are equally improved by exercise and impaired by disuse"

— Berkeley, George (1685-1753)

preview | full record

Date: 1710, 1714

"You would wonder to hear how close he pushes matters and how thoroughly he carries on the business of self-dissection. By virtue of this soliloquy, he becomes two distinct persons. He is pupil and preceptor. He teaches and he learns."

— Cooper, Anthony Ashley, third earl of Shaftesbury (1671-1713)

preview | full record

Date: 1710, 1714

"It must be such and such an Understanding; as when we say, for instance, such or such a Face: since Nature has characteriz'd Tempers and Minds as peculiarly as Faces."

— Cooper, Anthony Ashley, third earl of Shaftesbury (1671-1713)

preview | full record

Date: 1710, 1734

Ideas may be brought "bare and naked" into one's view, keeping out" the names.

— Berkeley, George (1685-1753)

preview | full record

Date: 1710, 1734

"Ancient and rooted prejudices do often pass into principles: and those propositions which once obtain the force and credit of a principle, are not only themselves, but likewise whatever is deducible from them, thought privileged from all examination. And there is no absurdity so gross, which by ...

— Berkeley, George (1685-1753)

preview | full record

Date: 1710, 1734

"Is it therefore to be wondered at, if the generality of men, who are ever intent on business or pleasure, and little used to fix or open the eye of their mind, should not have all that conviction and evidence of the being of God, which might be expected in reasonable creatures?"

— Berkeley, George (1685-1753)

preview | full record

Date: 1710 [1719, 1729]

"Reflection is the last and greatest Bliss: / When turning backwards with inverted Eyes, / The Soul it self and all its Charms, surveys, / The deep Impressions of Coelestial Grace / And Image of the Godhead."

— Oldisworth, William (1680-1734)

preview | full record

Date: 1710, 1714

The Parallel is easily made on the side of Writers. They have at least as much need of learning the several Motions, Counterpoises and Ballances of the Mind and Passions, as the other Students those of the Body and Limbs."

— Cooper, Anthony Ashley, third earl of Shaftesbury (1671-1713)

preview | full record

Date: From Thursd. March 16. to Saturd. March 18. 1710

"Reading is to the Mind, what Exercise is to the Body."

— Addison, Joseph (1672-1719)

preview | full record

Date: From Thursday May 18. to Saturday May 20. 1710

"By this Means, a disordered Mind, like a broken Limb, will recover its Strength by the sole Benefit of being out of Use, and lying without Motion."

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

preview | full record

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.