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Date: 1706

"If these known Arts cou'd heal my wounded Soul, / Cou'd recompence the Sorrows of my Days, / Or sooth the Sighings of my lonely Nights; / Well might you hope to woe me to your Wishes, / And win my Heart with your fond Tales of Love."

— Rowe, Nicholas (1674-1718)

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Date: 1707

The mind may be "soak'd in the bottom of the Belly" of one's Ignorance so that he needs the syrup of understanding and knowledge "to liquify the Matter" of his thoughts.

— Anonymous

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Date: 1707, 1710

"Nor should such ruffling Storms molest / The Halcyon Smoothness of thy Breast / Doubt, Avarice, and the pale Multitude / Of greedy Harpyes, which intrude / Ev'n at our Meals, no Entrance find / On the strong Armour of your Mind, / Which You can straiten or unbend."

— Cobb, Samuel (bap. 1675, d. 1713)

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Date: 1708, 1714

"They are certainly as ill Physicians in the Body-Politick, who wou'd needs be tampering with these mental Eruptions; and under the specious pretence of healing this Itch of Superstition, and saving Souls from the Contagion of Enthusiasm, shou'd set all Nature in an uproar, and turn a few innocen...

— Cooper, Anthony Ashley, third earl of Shaftesbury (1671-1713)

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Date: November 25, 1707; 1708

"Speak it, nor wound the Softness of my Soul / With these obscure Complainings; speak, my Lord."

— Rowe, Nicholas (1674-1718)

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Date: November 25, 1707; 1708

"Rage, and the Violence of lawless Passion, / Have blinded your clear Reason; wherefore else / This frantick wild Demand?"

— Rowe, Nicholas (1674-1718)

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Date: November 25, 1707; 1708

"Curst be your Looks, your Tongues, and your false Arts, / That cheat our Eyes, and wound our easie Hearts."

— Rowe, Nicholas (1674-1718)

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Date: September 20, 1692; 1708

"There are Beauties of the Mind, as well as of the Body, that take and prevail at first sight: And where-ever I have met with this, I have readily surrendered my self, and have never yet been deceiv'd in my Expectation."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1708

"That Passion you describe's a sleeping Potion, a lazy, stupid, lethargy of Mind, that nums our Faculties, destroys our Reason"

— Baker, Thomas (b. 1680-1)

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Date: 1708

"Attend therefore with the Ears of thy Heart, and look sharply with the Eyes of thy Understanding, upon that which I shall shew thee; it may be thou may'st find so much in it, as may serve to lead thee into the right way."

— Ockley, Simon (bap. 1679, d. 1720)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.