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Date: 1701

"That Opinion, Tremilia, denotes a diseas'd Mind, which is as naturally averse to every thing that's pleasant, and agreeable, as a Diseas'd Body is to wholsom Food."

— Baker, Thomas (b. 1680-1)

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Date: 1701

"No, Sir, Love is the greatest Enemy to Conversation, for even with the Young 'tis reckon'd a Disease of the Mind, but when the Old are seiz'd, 'tis a Sign of some very great Indisposition, and the Sentiments of craz'd People are seldom very extraordinary."

— Baker, Thomas (b. 1680-1)

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Date: 1701

"'Tis you handsom Mercers that wound all the Ladies Hearts."

— Baker, Thomas (b. 1680-1)

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Date: 1702

"The faculties of the Soul, like the parts of the Body, receive nourishment from use, and derive skill as well as they do force and vigour from exercise"

— Dennis, John (1658-1734)

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Date: 1702 [but see also earlier editions 1648, 1651]

"Thy Paradise, thro' whose fair Hills of Joy / Those Springs of everlasting Vigor range, / Which make Souls drunk with Heav'n, which cleanse away / All Earth from Dust, and Flesh to Spirit change."

— Beaumont, Joseph (1616-1699)

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Date: 1702

"If my wounded Mind / Could know a Thought of Peace, it would be now."

— Rowe, Nicholas (1674-1718)

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Date: 1700, 1702

"Her thoughtful Soul, labours with some event / Of high import, which bustles like an Embryo / In its dark Room, and longs to be disclos'd."

— Rowe, Nicholas (1674-1718)

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Date: 1702

"Thine I have now receiv'd, which manifests/ Thou hast had some regard to my Requests; / And by these good Effects, dost testify, / Thou'rt not so much inclin'd to Vanity, / To Childish Sports, and Time-beguiling Play, / As thou hast been therein, and spent thy Day:/ Endeared Friend, may's...

— Mollineux [née Southworth], Mary (1651-1695)

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Date: w. 1684, 1702

"These rugged Walls, less grievous are to me, / Than those bedeck'd with curious Arras be / T'a guilty Conscience; to a wounded Heart, / A Palace cannot palliate that smart: / Tho' drunk with Pleasure, dull with Opiates, / Some seem as Senseless of their sad Estates, / Till on their Dying-Beds Co...

— Mollineux [née Southworth], Mary (1651-1695)

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Date: 1703, 1718

"Guilt's infernal Gloom, and horrid Night" may "O'erwhelm [Man's] Intellectual Sight"

— Blackmore, Sir Richard (1654-1729)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.