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Date: 1686, 1689, 1697

"For certain 'tis that Memory in Youth is infinitely more ready than in men of riper years, as appears from their different capacitys in learning of a Language; and then for Invention which always builds out of the Store-house of Memory, 'tis then most perfect and various when the Spirits are mos...

— Nourse, Timothy (c.1636–1699)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"If therefore we will warily attend to the Motions of the Mind, and observe what Course it usually takes in its way to Knowledge, we shall, I think, find that the Mind having got any Idea, which it thinks it may have use of, either in Contemplation or Discourse; the first Thing it does, is to abs...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1691

"As the Eyes are the Windows to let in the Species of all exterior Objects into the dark Cels of the Brain, for the information of the Soul; so are they flaming Torches to reveal to those abroad how the Soul within is moved or affected."

— Ray [formerly Wray], John (1627–1705)

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Date: Monday, December 17, 1711

"Now as to the peculiar Qualities of the Eye, that fine Part of our Constitution seems as much the Receptacle and Seat of our Passions, Appetites and Inclinations as the Mind it self; and at least it is the outward Portal to introduce them to the House within, or rather the common Thorough-fare t...

— Anonymous

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Date: Tuesday, June 24, 1712

"Our Admiration, which is a very pleasing Motion of the Mind, immediately rises at the Consideration of any Object that takes up a great deal of Room in the Fancy, and by Consequence, will improve into the highest Pitch of Astonishment and Devotion when we contemplate his Nature, that is neither ...

— Addison, Joseph (1672-1719)

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Date: 1713, 1734

"And although it may, perhaps, seem an uneasy reflexion to some, that when they have taken a circuit through so many refined and unvulgar notions, they should at last come to think like other men: yet, methinks, this return to the simple dictates of Nature, after having wandered through the wild ...

— Berkeley, George (1685-1753)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.