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Date: 1713, 1734

"We are chained to a Body, that is to say, our Perceptions are connected with corporeal Motions."

— Berkeley, George (1685-1753)

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Date: 1713, 1734

"Therefore, to explain the Phaenomena, is to shew how we come to be affected with Ideas, in that Manner and Series, wherein they are imprinted on our Senses."

— Berkeley, George (1685-1753)

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Date: 1713, 1734

"I have been a long time distrusting my Senses; methought I saw things by a dim Light, and thro false Glasses. Now, the Glasses are removed, and a new Light breaks in upon my Understanding."

— Berkeley, George (1685-1753)

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Date: 1719, 1720

"For, says he, PUNS are like so many Torch-Lights in the Head, that give the Soul a very distinct View of those Images, which she before seemed to groap after as if she had been imprisoned in a Dungeon."

— Sheridan, Thomas (1687-1738)

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Date: 1728

"At our Birth the Imagination is intirely a Tabula Rasa or perfect Blank, without any other Materials either for a Simple View or any Other Operation of the Intellect"

— Browne, Peter (d. 1735)

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Date: 1728

"With respect to the simple Perception of Mere Sense he is still upon the same Level with Brutes; he is altogether Passive; he retains all the Signatures and Impressions of outward Objects, but in the very Order only in which they are stamped; with Transposing or Altering, Dividing, or Compoundin...

— Browne, Peter (d. 1735)

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Date: 1728

It is by the senses that "the Ideas of external sensible Objects are first conveyed into the Imagination; and Reason or the pure Intellect ... operates upon those Ideas, and upon them, Only after they are so lodged in that common Receptacle"

— Browne, Peter (d. 1735)

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Date: 1732

"Neither birth, nor books, nor conversation, can introduce a knowledge of the world into a conceited mind, which will ever be its own object, and contemplate mankind in its own mirror!"

— Berkeley, George (1685-1753)

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Date: 1732

"You must know, said he, that the mind of man may be fitly compared to a piece of land. What stubbing, ploughing, digging, and harrowing is to the one, that thinking, reflecting, examining is to the other."

— Berkeley, George (1685-1753)

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Date: 1732

"Each hath its proper culture; and as land that is suffered to lie waste and wild for a long tract of time will be overspread with brushwood, brambles, thorns, and such vegetables which have neither use nor beauty; even so there will not fail to sprout up in a neglected, uncultivated mind, a grea...

— Berkeley, George (1685-1753)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.