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Date: 1607

"To quench thy learned thirst I meant to draine / The Hippocrenian Fountaine of my braine."

— Walkington, Thomas (b. c. 1575, d. 1621)

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Date: 1610

Souls may "by our first touch, take in / The poisonous tincture of original sin"

— Donne, John (1572-1631)

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Date: 1632

"Looke as it is with a Gold smith that melteth the metall that he is to make a vessell of, if after the melting thereof, there follow a cooling, it had beene as good it had never beene melted, it is as hard, haply harder, as unfit, haply unfitter, then it was before to make vessell of; but after ...

— Hooker, Richard (1554-1600)

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Date: 1654

"First, all honest hearts are put into a just; but unprofitable horror, to think that such a flagitious wickedness could be committed; Then the Mother, who had rinced her soule with a fountain of teares, for so hatefull a miscarriage, and reconciled her self to that God, who was the only witness ...

— Hall, Joseph (1574-1656)

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Date: 1642, 1655, 1668

"O could I flow like thee, and make thy stream / My great example, as it is my theme! / Though deep, yet clear, though gentle, yet not dull, / Strong without rage, without ore-flowing full."

— Denham, John, Sir (1615-1669)

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Date: 1660, 1676

"In these men the principles are holy, the instruction perfect, the law remaining, the perswasions uncancelled; but against all this torrent there is a whirlwind of passions, and filthy resolutions, and wilfulness, which corrupt the heart, while as yet the head is uncorrupted in the direct rules ...

— Taylor, Jeremy (bap. 1613, 1667)

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Date: 1681

"The mind, that ocean where each kind / Does straight its own resemblance find, / Yet it creates, transcending these, / Far other worlds, and other seas"

— Marvell, Andrew (1621-1678)

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Date: 1682

"Betwixt violent Passion, and a Fluctuation, or Wambling of the Mind, there is such a Difference, as betwixt the Agitation of a Storm, and the Nauseous Sickness of a Calm."

— L'Estrange, Sir Roger (1616-1704)

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Date: 1691

"I cannot conceive the true Cause hereof [that Men of Learning are uncouth in their discourse], unless it be, that as Plants are Choakt by over-much Moisture, and Lamps are Stifl'd with too much Oil; so are the Actions of the Mind overwhelm'd by over-abundance of Matter and Study."

— Blount, Thomas Pope, Sir (1649-1697)

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Date: 1691

"Why just then, all of a sudden, before I cou'd say what's this, or knew where I was, my Noddle now swimming with a million of Fancies, (as I alwayes had a very working Brain,) and I not minding my way, in tumbled I into the River, hugging the waves so tenderly, you can't imagine."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.