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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"[I]n some, where they are set on with care and repeated impressions, either through the temper of the Body, or some other default, the Memory is very weak"

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"And our Minds represent to us those Tombs, to which we are approaching; where though the Brass and Marble remain, yet the Inscriptions are effaced by time, and the Imagery moulders away."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"The pictures drawn in our Minds, are laid in fading Colours; and if not sometimes refreshed, vanish and disappear."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"How much the Constitution of our Bodies, and the make of our animal Spirits, are concerned in this; and whether the Temper of the Brain make this difference, that in some it retains the Characters drawn on it like Marble, in others like Free-stone, and in others little better than Sand, I shall ...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"I shall not here enquire, though it may seem probable, that the Constitution of the Body does sometimes influence the Memory; since we oftentimes find a Disease quite strip the Mind of all its Ideas, and the flames of a Fever, in a few days, calcine all those Images to dust and confusion, which ...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"The Mind very often sets it self on work in search of some hidden Idea, and turns, as it were, the Eye of the Soul upon it."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

Ideas may be "rouzed and tumbled out of their dark Cells, into open Day-light"

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"For to what purpose should Characters be graven on the Mind, by the Finger of God, which are not clearer there, than those, which are afterwards introduced, or cannot be distinguish'd from them?"

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"By which way one may prove any thing, and it is but supposing that all watches, whilst the balance beats, think; and it is sufficiently proved, and past doubt, that my watch thought all last night."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"I ask in the first case, Whether the Day- and the Night-man would not be two as distinct Persons, as Socrates and Plato; and whether in the second case, there would not be one Person in two distinct Bodies, as much as one Man is the same in two distinct clothings."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.