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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"These simple Ideas, when offered to the mind, the Understanding can no more refuse to have, nor alter, when they are imprinted, nor blot them out, and make new ones in it self, than a mirror can refuse, alter, or obliterate the Images or Ideas, which, the Objects set before it, do therein produce."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Having also given a power to our Minds, in several Instances, to chuse, amongst its Ideas, which it will think on, and to pursue the enquiry of this or that Subject with consideration and attention, to excite us to these Actions of thinking and motion, that we are capable of, has been ple...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"And so we should neither stir our Bodies, nor employ our Minds; but let our Thoughts (if I may so call it) run a drift, without any direction or design; and suffer the Ideas of our Minds, like unregarded shadows, to make their appearances there, as it happen'd, without attending to them."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Which Qualities [hot, light, white, cold, sweet] are commonly thought to be the same in those Bodies, that those Ideas are in us, the one the perfect resemblance of the other, as they are in a Mirror."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"But when we consider the Sun, in reference to Wax, which it melts or blanches, we look upon the Whiteness and Softness produced in the Wax, not as Qualities in the Sun, but effects produced by Powers in it: Whereas, if rightly considered, these Qualities of Light and Warmth, which are Perception...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"How, as it were in an instant, do our Minds, with one glance, see all the parts of a demonstration, which may very well be called a long one, if we consider the time it will require to put into words, and step by step shew it another?"

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"How far such an one [one in whom "decrepid old Age" has blotted out Memory] (notwithstanding all that is boasted of innate Principles) is in his Knowledge, and intellectual Faculties, above the Condition of a Cockle, or an Oyster, I leave to be considered."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"This is Memory, which is as it were the Store-house of our Ideas."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"For the narrow Mind of Man, not being capable of having many Ideas under View and Consideration at once, it was necessary to have a Repository, to lay up those Ideas, which at another time it might have use of."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"And in this Sense it is, that our Ideas are said to be in our Memories, when indeed, they are actually no where, but only there is an ability in the Mind, when it will, to revive them again; and as it were paint them anew on it self, though some with more, some with less difficulty, some more li...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.