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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"This would be, to make Nature take Pains to no Purpose; Or, at least, to write very ill; since its Characters could not be read by those Eyes, which saw other things very well: and those are very ill supposed the clearest parts of Truth, and the Foundations of all our Knowledge."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"But there is this farther Argument in it against their being innate: That these Characters, if they were native and original Impressions, should appear fairest and clearest in those Persons, in whom yet we find no Footsteps of them."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"For Children, Ideots, Savages, and illiterate People, being of all others the least corrupted by Custom, or borrowed Opinions; Learning, and Education, having not cast their Native thoughts into new Moulds; nor by super-inducing foreign and studied Doctrines, confounded those fair Characters Nat...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"It might be very well expected, that these Principles should be perfectly known to Naturals; which being stamped immediately on the Soul (as these Men suppose) can have no dependence on the Constitutions, or Organs of the Body, the only confessed difference between them and others."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

Native beams of light should shine out in their "full Lustre" in children, idiots, and savages.

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

Natural "Characters engraven on the Mind" must needs be visible by themselves by their own light

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Hence naturally flows the great variety of Opinions, concerning Moral Rules, which are to be found amongst Men, according to the different sorts of Happiness, they have a Prospect of, or propose to themselves: Which could not be, if practical Principles were innate, and imprinted in our Minds im...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"To which, I answer, That I doubt not, but without being written on their Hearts, many Men, may, by the same way that they come to Knowledge of other things, come to assent to several Moral Rules, and be convinced of their Obligation."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"That the innate Principles of Morality, may, by Education, and Custom, and the general Opinion of those amongst whom we converse, be darkned, and at last quite worn out of the Minds of Men."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"It is easy to imagine, how by these means it comes to pass, that Men worship the Idols that have been set up in their Minds; grow fond of Notions they have been long acquainted with there."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.