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Date: 1727

"He endeavoured to wear it off of his Mind, but it [would] not do; the Impression to be sure would be strengthned by his own Guilt, and both together brought him to himself."

— Defoe, Daniel (1660?-1731)

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Date: 1727

"Upon what Religious Foundation can we suggest, that the Sins of the Children should disquiet the Fathers in their Graves, or that the Souls departed can receive any Impression from the Behaviour of those in Life, subsequent to any Action those Souls departed have been concern'd in?"

— Defoe, Daniel (1660?-1731)

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Date: 1727

"But as it might be a kind Messenger from another part of the invisible World, where his approaching Fate was known, and who having given him this Notice, left his Reformation in his own Power, and laid the Necessity of it before the Eyes of his Reason, as well as of his Conscience, and that afte...

— Defoe, Daniel (1660?-1731)

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Date: 1727

"Sure, said I, my Cousin M-- D-- must have the clearest Conscience in the Universe, he has not the least Scar upon his Inside."

— Defoe, Daniel (1660?-1731)

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Date: 1727

"Did the least Spot upon his Soul appear, / It could not be: his Conscience must be clear."

— Defoe, Daniel (1660?-1731)

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Date: 1727

"But I mistook my Kinsman most extremely, for on the contrary, his Soul is blacker than Negro Sancho, the Beauty of Africa; he boasts himself of the most harden'd Crime, defies Heaven, despises Terror, and is got above Fear by the meer force of a flagrant Assurance."

— Defoe, Daniel (1660?-1731)

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Date: 1727

"But leaving it therefore where we find it, I say if you see an Apparition, that is such an Apparition as we have been speaking of, not a Phantosm of your own Brain, not an imaginary Apparition the effect of Fright or Dream, or meer Whimsie, not a Hypocondriack Apparition, the effect of Vapours a...

— Defoe, Daniel (1660?-1731)

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Date: 1727

"It is without Doubt, that Fancy and Imagination form a world of Apparitions in the Minds of Men and Women; (for we must not exclude the Ladies in this Part, whatever we do) and People go away as thoroughly possess'd with the Reality of having seen the Devil, as if they convers'd Face to Face wit...

— Defoe, Daniel (1660?-1731)

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Date: 1737

"So many things freely thrown out, such lengths of unreserv'd friendship, thoughts just warm from the brain, without any polishing or dress, the very dishabille of the understanding."

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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Date: 1737

""Alas, my soul! thou pleasing companion of this body, thou fleeting thing that art now deserting it! whither art thou flying? to what unknown scene? all trembling, fearful, and pensive! what now is become of thy former wit and humour? thou shalt jest and be gay no more."

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.