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Date: 1700

One may call his Senses to his aid, and "In vain Rebel," but soon he is "by ev'ry Sense betray'd"

— Hopkins, John (b. 1675)

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Date: 1700

"O'er Sense, o'er Reason, and o'er Love it Rules, / Custom, the Guardian, and the guide of Fools."

— Hopkins, John (b. 1675)

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Date: 1700

"Whilst in my Soul Despair her Court maintains, / And with deep Pomp in solid Darkness Reigns."

— Hopkins, John (b. 1675)

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Date: 1700

"They cannot, no; each sigh Love's flight sustains, / O'er my own Heart in my own Breast he Reigns, / And holds too strong, my strugling Soul in Chains."

— Hopkins, John (b. 1675)

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Date: 1700

"My Thoughts should like their Silver Fishes shine, / With quick, bright glitterings thro' each moving line."

— Hopkins, John (b. 1675)

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Date: 1701

"Man is a Creature of so mixed a Composure, and of a Frame so inconsistent and different from Itself, that it easily speaks his Affinity to the highest and meanest Beings; that is to say, he is made of Body and Soul, he is at once an Engine and an Engineer."

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

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Date: 1701

"This may give him hopes, that tho' his Trunk return to its native Dust he may not all Perish, but the Inhabitant of it may remove to another Mansion; especially since he knows only Mechanically that they have, not Demonstratively how they have, even a present Union."

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

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Date: 1702

Some Objects may "promote our Joy, are bright to the Eye, or stamp upon our Minds, Pleasure, and Self-satisfaction"

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

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Date: 1702

"O Woman, Woman, of Artifice created! whose Nature, even distracted, has a Cunning: In vain let Man his Sense, his Learning boast, when Womans Madness over-rules his Reason."

— Farquhar, George (1676/7-1707)

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Date: May 10, 1704

"Others of these professors, though agreeing in the main system, were yet more refined upon certain branches of it; and held that man was an animal compounded of two dresses, the natural and the celestial suit, which were the body and soul; that the soul was the outward, and the body the inward c...

— Swift, Jonathan (1667-1745)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.