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Date: 1775

"Coriolanus has here carried his sternness, and the strained principles of stoical pride, whose throne is only in the mind, as far as they could go; and now great Nature, whose more sovereign seat of empire is in the heart, takes her turn to triumph; for upon the joint prayers, tears, and intreat...

— Griffith, Elizabeth (1720-1793)

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Date: 1775

"There is a contagion in minds and manners, as well as in bodies, when corrupt."

— Griffith, Elizabeth (1720-1793)

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Date: 1775

"But, as I have said before, I do not think that ethic philosophy can ever be a gainer, by overstraining the sinews of the human mind."

— Griffith, Elizabeth (1720-1793)

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Date: 1775

"In this scenic province of instruction, our representations are much better calculated to answer the end proposed, than those of the Antients were, on account of the different hours of exhibition. Theirs were performed in the morning; which circumstance suffered the salutary effect to be worn ou...

— Griffith, Elizabeth (1720-1793)

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Date: 1776

"he more approaching to the testimony of our senses every philosophical solution is, the more perhaps is it conformable to nature."

— Goldsmith, Oliver (1728?-1774)

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Date: 1790

"This it has been the glory of the great masters in all the arts to confront, and to overcome; and when they had overcome the first difficulty, to turn it into an instrument for new conquests over new difficulties; thus to enable them to extend the empire of their science; and even to push forwar...

— Burke, Edmund (1729-1797)

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Date: 1790

"All the decent drapery of life is to be rudely torn off. All the superadded ideas, furnished from the wardrobe of a moral imagination, which the heart owns, and the understanding ratifies, as necessary to cover the defects of our naked shivering nature."

— Burke, Edmund (1729-1797)

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Date: 1790

"All the pleasing illusions, which made power gentle, and obedience liberal, which harmonized the different shades of life, and which, by a bland assimilation, incorporated into politics the sentiments which beautify and soften private society, are to be dissolved by this new conquering empire of...

— Burke, Edmund (1729-1797)

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Date: 1790

"All your sophisters cannot produce any thing better adapted to preserve a rational and manly freedom than the course that we have pursued, who have chosen our nature rather than our speculations, our breasts rather than our inventions, for the great conservatories and magazines of our rights and...

— Burke, Edmund (1729-1797)

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Date: 1790

"It is plain that the mind of this political Preacher was at the time big with some extraordinary design; and it is very probable, that the thoughts of his audience, who understood him better than I do, did all along run before him in his reflection, and in the whole train of consequences to whic...

— Burke, Edmund (1729-1797)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.