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Date: 1722

"The disappointed advocate, finding she had so unexpected a support, on cooler thoughts descended to a composition, which I, without her knowledge, secretly discharged."

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

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Date: 1722

"You say this because I wrung you to the heart when I touched your guilty conscience about Judy"

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

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Date: 1722

"Have I then at last a father's sanction on my love? His bounteous hand to give and make my heart a present worthy of Bevil's generosity?"

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

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Date: 1724

"If I have here touch'd a young Lady's Vanity and Levity, it was to show her how beautiful she is without those Blots, which certainly stain the Mind, and stamp Deformity where the greatest Beauties would shine, were they banish'd."

— Davys, Mary (1674-1732)

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Date: 1724

"Vanity is a lurking subtile Thief, that works itself insensibly into our Bosoms, and while we declare our dislike to it, know not 'tis so near us; every body being (as a witty Gentleman has somewhere said) provided with a Racket to strike it from themselves."

— Davys, Mary (1674-1732)

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Date: 1725

"I wou'd have all those soft-hearted Ladies that are impress'd like Wax, read Quevedo's 'Vision of Loving-Fools.'"

— Davys, Mary (1674-1732)

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Date: 1725

"My Delia's Words still bear the Stamp of Wit, / Impress'd too plainly to be counterfeit: / Which, with the Weight of massy Reason join'd, / Declare the Strength and Quickness of her Mind; / Her Thoughts are noble, and her Sense refin'd."

— Davys, Mary (1674-1732)

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Date: September 10, 1726

"To explain this, we must consider that the first Image which an outward Object imprints on our Brain is very slight; it resembles a thin Vapour which dwindles into nothing, without leaving the least track after it. But if the same Object successively offers itself several times, the Image it occ...

— Arbuckle, James (d. 1742)

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Date: September 10, 1726

"Now, according to my supposition, there being no active intelligent Being, who, by his Presence and Superintendency, governs and directs the Course of those vagabond Images, every thing in the Brain resembles the fortuitous concourse of Atoms."

— Arbuckle, James (d. 1742)

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Date: September 10, 1726

"Two Images meet, and unite to each other; these two meeting with a third, it unites to them in the same manner: and this Meeting and Union continuing for some time, at last occasions a most monstrous Aggregation, very like the Chaos of the Poet, where 'Frigida cum calidis pugnant, humentia sicci...

— Arbuckle, James (d. 1742)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.