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Date: 1739

"How poor thy Pow'r, how empty is thy Happiness, / When such a Wretch, as I appear to be, / Can ride thy Temper, harrow up thy Form, / And stretch thy Soul upon the Rack of Passion."

— Brooke, Henry (c. 1703-1783)

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Date: 1739

"Where lives the Man whose Reason slumbers not?"

— Brooke, Henry (c. 1703-1783)

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Date: 1746, 1749

"For the hurt Eye an instant Cure you find; Then why neglect, for Years, the sickening Mind?"

— Francis, Philip (1708-1773)

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Date: 1733, 1748

Memory is a "Surprising storehouse! in whose narrow womb / All things, the past, the present, and to come, / Find ample space, and large and mighty room."

— Pilkington, Laetitia (c. 1709-1750)

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Date: 1749

"Not Rome's sad Ruins such Impressions leave, / As Reason bury'd in the Body's Grave:"

— Jones, Henry (1721-1770)

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Date: 1754

"For [Fancy], / The blue ethereal Arch expands; her Table / Spread out with all the Dainties of the Sky, / Imagination's rich Regale."

— Jones, Henry (1721-1770)

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Date: 1755

The "busy Statesman's mind" may grow putrid on the throne of power so that "Fresh vices spring up ev'ry hour; / As in dead corses serpents breed, / And loathsome, on corruption feed"

— Derrick, Samuel (1724-1769)

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Date: 1756

"Oh! my dear love, quick, quickly drive away / Those boding thoughts which on your quiet prey; / The breed of Fancy, gender'd in the brain, / Nurs'd by the grosser spirits, light, and vain; / The vagrant visions of the sleeping mind, / Which vanish wak'd, nor leave a mark behind."

— Bickerstaff, Isaac (b. 1733, d. after 1808)

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Date: 1756

"Let then my soul and body be a-kin, / Naked without, as desolate within."

— Bickerstaff, Isaac (b. 1733, d. after 1808)

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Date: 1757

"The mind of man has naturally a far greater alacrity and satisfaction in tracing resemblances than in searching for differences; because by making resemblances we produce new images, we unite, we create, we enlarge our stock; but in making distinctions we offer no food at all to the imagi...

— Burke, Edmund (1729-1797)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.