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Date: Wednesday, January 9, 1712

"So great an Assembly of Ladies placed in gradual Rows in all the Ornaments of Jewels, Silk and Colours, gave so lively and gay an Impression to the Heart, that methought the Season of the Year was vanished; and I did not think it an ill Expression of a young Fellow who stood near me, that called...

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

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Date: Friday, February 15, 1712

"Her Person, as it is thus studiously embellished by Nature, thus adorned with unpremeditated Graces, is a fit Lodging for a Mind so fair and lovely; there dwell rational Piety, modest Hope, and chearful Resignation."

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

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Date: Friday, February 15, 1712

"He might have longer wandered in the Labyrinths of Vice and Folly, had not Emilia's prudent Conduct won him over to the Government of his Reason."

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

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Date: February 27, 1712

"On the other hand, without any Touch of Envy, a temperate and well-govern'd Mind looks down on such as are exalted with Success, with a certain Shame for the Imbecility of human Nature, that can so far forget how liable it is to Calamity, as to grow giddy with only the Suspence of Sorrow, which ...

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

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Date: February 27, 1712

"It is certainly the proper Education we should give our selves, to be prepared for the ill Events and Accidents we are to meet with in a Life sentenced to be a Scene of Sorrow: But instead of this Expectation, we soften our selves with Prospects of constant Delight, and destroy in our Minds the ...

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

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Date: Monday, April 28, 1712

"From hence my Thoughts took Occasion to ramble into the general Notion of Travelling, as it is now made a Part of Education."

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

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Date: Monday, April 28, 1712

"Thus he spends his time as Children do at Puppet-Shows, and with much the same Advantage, in staring and gaping at an amazing Variety of strange things: strange indeed to one who is not prepared to comprehend the Reasons and Meaning of them; whilst he should be laying the solid Foundations of Kn...

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

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Date: Monday, April 28, 1712

"But how can any of these Advantages be attained by one who is a mere Stranger to the Customs and Policies of his native Country, and has not yet fixed in his Mind the first Principles of Manners and Behaviour? To endeavour it, is to build a gawdy Structure without any Foundation; or, if I may be...

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

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Date: Monday, April 28, 1712

"This must certainly be a most charming Exercise to the Mind that is rightly turned for it."

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

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Date: Wednesday, April 30, 1712

"That Devotion to his Mistress kindles in his Mind a general Tenderness, which exerts it self towards every Object as well as his Fair-one."

— Steele, Sir Richard (1672-1729)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.