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Date: 1807

"The individual whose substance is the more advanced Spirit runs through this past just as one who takes up a higher science goes through the preparatory studies he has long since absorbed, in order to bring their content to mind: he recalls them to the inward eye, but has no lasting interest in ...

— Hegel, G. W. F. (1770-1831)

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Date: 1819

The "Arab is as intimately connected with camel and horse as is body with soul"

— Goethe, Johann Wolfgang (1749-1832)

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Date: 1830

"But mind is not merely this abstractly simple being equivalent to light, which was how it was considered when the simplicity of the soul in contrast to the composite nature of the body was under discussion."

— Hegel, G. W. F. (1770-1831)

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Date: 1830

"To grasp intelligence as this night-like mine or pit in which is stored a world of infinitely many images and representations, yet without being in consciousness, is from the one point of view the universal postulate which bids us treat the notion as concrete, in the way we treat, for example, t...

— Hegel, G. W. F. (1770-1831)

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Date: 1805-6, published 1833-6

"Spirit often seems to have forgotten and lost itself, but inwardly opposed to itself, it is inwardly working ever forward (as when Hamlet says of the ghost of his father, 'Well said, old mole! canst work i' the ground so fast?') until grown strong in itself it bursts asunder the crust of earth w...

— Hegel, G. W. F. (1770-1831)

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Date: 1805-6, published 1833-6

"At such a time, when the encircling crust, like a soulless decaying tenement, crumbles away, and spirit displays itself arrayed in new youth, the seven league boots are at length adopted"

— Hegel, G. W. F. (1770-1831)

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Date: 1805-6, published 1833-6

"Kant however places the matter somewhat in this fashion: there are things-in-themselves outside, but devoid of time and space; consciousness now comes, and it has time and space beforehand present in it as the possibility of experience, just as in order to eat it has mouth and teeth, &c., as con...

— Hegel, G. W. F. (1770-1831)

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Date: 1805-6, published 1833-6

"Knowledge itself is in fact the unity and truth of both moments; but with Kant the thinking understanding and sensuousness are both something particular, and they are only united in an external, superficial way, just as a piece of wood and a leg might be bound together by a cord."

— Hegel, G. W. F. (1770-1831)

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Date: 1805-6, published 1833-6

"The third faculty Kant finds in reason, to which he advances from the understanding after the same psychological method; that is to say, he hunts through the soul's sack to see what faculties are still to be found there; and thus by merest chance he lights on Reason."

— Hegel, G. W. F. (1770-1831)

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Date: 1805-6, published 1833-6

"It would make no difference if there had been no Reason there, just as with physicists it is a matter of perfect indifference whether, for instance, there is such a thing as magnetism or not."

— Hegel, G. W. F. (1770-1831)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.