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Date: 1744, 1753

"This, indeed, is the only Situation I can imagine dreadful enough to conquer a Mind endued with true Principles, or armed with any moderate Degree of Fortitude and Patience."

— Fielding, Sarah (1710-1768)

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Date: 1744, 1753

"But here I would not be understood, as if David Simple, overcome by Timidity and Despair, raged or raved at his Misfortunes; or as if he did not exert the utmost human Patience, in submitting to them: only that his Mind was so far weakened and conquered by the Distress of his Family, that...

— Fielding, Sarah (1710-1768)

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Date: 1744, 1753

"Pictures of the Distress of my Family began to succeed each other in my Mind, and Terror and Timidity conquered my better Judgment."

— Fielding, Sarah (1710-1768)

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Date: 1744, 1753

"But, with a strong and lively Hope in the Revelation God has been pleased to send us, and with a Heart swelling with Gratitude for that Revelation, I can carry my Prospect beyond the Grave; and, painful as my Distemper is, I can now sit in my Bed with a calm Resignation, to which my conquered Mi...

— Fielding, Sarah (1710-1768)

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Date: 1744, 1753

"I shall not dwell long on this Circumstance, but only tell you, there came a young Lady one day to dine with Dorimene, who was really one of the greatest Beauties I ever saw; Vieuville was in a moment struck with her Charms, and she presently made a Conquest of his Heart."

— Fielding, Sarah (1710-1768)

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Date: 1744, 1753

"Dumont's Absence, and her own returning Health, enabled her seriously to set about the conquering her Passion."

— Fielding, Sarah (1710-1768)

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Date: 1744, 1753

"I conjure you, Madam, by all the Ties of Virtue and of Honour, to collect all your Force, make use of that Strength of Reason Nature has given you, gloriously to conquer this unfortunate Passion which has seized you, and which, if indulged, must inevitably end in the Destruction of us all."

— Fielding, Sarah (1710-1768)

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Date: 1744, 1753

"Sometimes he flattered himself with the Thoughts that Time and Reason would turn Dorimene from her horrid Purpose, and enable her to conquer this unreasonable Passion."

— Fielding, Sarah (1710-1768)

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Date: 1744, 1753

"He ordered his Coach to drive into Fleetstreet, that he might be out of the Neighbourhood, and hearing of the Cause of his Torment; he took a Lodging in that Street; and the Moment he was at liberty to reflect on what had passed, found it was much harder to conquer a Passion than to raise...

— Fielding, Sarah (1710-1768)

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Date: 1744, 1753

"But alas! better had it been for us both, had she for ever shut herself from the World, and spent her time in conquering, instead of endeavouring to gratify and indulge her Passion."

— Fielding, Sarah (1710-1768)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.