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Date: 1763, 1770

"Yes, doubtless, steel'd--but still he show'd a heart, / As soft, as Cleopatra's softest part."

— Thompson, Edward (1738-1786)

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Date: 1763

"Grown old in villainy, and dead to grace, / Hell in his heart, and TYBURNE in his face; / Behold, a Parson at thy Elbow stands, / Low'ring damnation, and with open hands / Ripe to betray his Saviour for reward; / The Atheist Chaplain of an Atheist Lord."

— Churchill, Charles (1731-1764)

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Date: 1763 (repr. 1776); 1794 (repr. 1799)

"We remember that best in the morning, which we learnt just before we went to sleep: because, say the Cartesians, the traces made then are not apt to be effaced by the motions of the spirits, as they would, if new objects of sensation had presented themselves; and during this interval, t...

— Doddridge, Philip (1702-1751)

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Date: 1763 (repr. 1776); 1794 (repr. 1799)

"Sensible ideas gradually decay in the memory if they be not refreshed by new sensations; the traces perhaps wearing out: yet they may last many years."

— Doddridge, Philip (1702-1751)

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Date: 1763 (repr. 1776); 1794 (repr. 1799)

"When a train of ideas is very familiar to the mind, they often follow one another in the memory without any laborious recollection, and so as to arise almost instantaneously and mechanically; as in writing, singing, &c. the traces between them being worn like beaten roads."

— Doddridge, Philip (1702-1751)

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Date: 1763 (repr. 1776); 1794 (repr. 1799)

"The analogy upon this hypothesis between sensation and memory, the one arising from impressions made on the brain, the other depending on traces continued there."

— Doddridge, Philip (1702-1751)

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Date: 1763 (repr. 1776); 1794 (repr. 1799)

"Mr. Locke accounts for the association of ideas, which is the cause of antipathies and many errors, with, other strange phænomena, by memory; supposing such traces are worn on the brain as unite ideas, so that when the mind turns to one it should almost necessarily fall on the other too."

— Doddridge, Philip (1702-1751)

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Date: 1763 (repr. 1776); 1794 (repr. 1799)

"When actual thought is suspended, there may remain some secret power of thinking resulting from the constitution of the soul, which will exert itself when the obstruction is removed. As a bow when bent has a disposition to straiten itself again, or a clock to strike, though the hammer be held ba...

— Doddridge, Philip (1702-1751)

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Date: 1763 (repr. 1776); 1794 (repr. 1799)

"That mind is said to be possessed of NATURAL LIBERTY, or liberty of choice, which is so constituted, as that its volitions shall not be invincibly determined by any foreign cause or consideration whatever offered to it, but by its own sovereign pleasure."

— Doddridge, Philip (1702-1751)

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Date: 1763 (repr. 1776); 1794 (repr. 1799)

"PHILOSOPHICAL LIBERTY consists in a prevailing disposition to act according to the dictates of reason; i. e. in such a manner, as shall, all things considered, most effectually promote our happiness. A disposition to act contrary to this is MENTAL SERVITUDE: and when the mind is equally...

— Doddridge, Philip (1702-1751)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.