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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"When Ideas float in our Mind, without any reflection or regard of the Understanding, it is that which the French call 'Resvery' [Reverie]; our Language has scarce a name for it."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"The floating of other mens Opinions in our brains, makes us not one jot the more knowing, though they happen to be true."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1691

"As the Eyes are the Windows to let in the Species of all exterior Objects into the dark Cels of the Brain, for the information of the Soul; so are they flaming Torches to reveal to those abroad how the Soul within is moved or affected."

— Ray [formerly Wray], John (1627–1705)

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Date: 1698

"He can't be assured the same Colours of Reason and Desire will last. Any little Accident from without may metamorphose his Fancy, and push him upon a new set of Thoughts."

— Collier, Jeremy (1650-1726)

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Date: 1708, 1714

"The Human Mind and Body are both of 'em naturally subject to Commotions: and as there are strange Ferments in the Blood, which in many Bodys occasion an extraordinary discharge; so in Reason too, there are heterogeneous Particles which must be thrown off by Fermentation."

— Cooper, Anthony Ashley, third earl of Shaftesbury (1671-1713)

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Date: 1708, 1714

"Methinks, my Lord, it wou'd be well for us, if before we ascended into the higher Regions of Divinity, we wou'd vouchsafe to descend a little into ourselves, and bestow some poor Thoughts upon plain honest Morals."

— Cooper, Anthony Ashley, third earl of Shaftesbury (1671-1713)

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Date: April 26, 1695; 1708

"Meditating by one's self is like digging in the Mine; it often, perhaps, brings up maiden Earth, which never came near the Light before; but whether it contain any Metal in it, is never so well tried as in Conversation with a knowing judicious Friend, who carries about him the true Touch-stone, ...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: March 30, 1696; 1708

"Nay, I so far incline to comply with your Desires, that I every now and then lay by some Materials for it, as they occasionally occur in the Rovings of my Mind."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: June 15, 1697; 1708

"Do but think then what a Pleasure, what an Advantage it would be to me, to have you by me, who have so much Thought, so much Clearness, so much Penetration, all directed to the same Aim which I propose to my self, in all the Ramblings of my Mind."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1709, 1714

"Nor is it a wonder that Men are generally such faint Reasoners, and care so little to argue strictly on any trivial Subject in Company; when they dare so little exert their Reason in greater Matters, and are forc'd to argue lamely, where they have need of the greatest Activity and Strength. The ...

— Cooper, Anthony Ashley, third earl of Shaftesbury (1671-1713)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.