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Date: 1723

"Alfred awakens from the Vision, which leaves deep Impression on his Mind."

— Blackmore, Sir Richard (1654-1729)

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Date: 1723

"For still we find Plebeian Minds are sway'd / By strong Impressions on the Senses made"

— Blackmore, Sir Richard (1654-1729)

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Date: 1723

"When Alfred thus had view'd with ravish'd Eyes / These bright Etherial Seats, these happy Skies, / Which on his Soul divine Impressions made, / And high Idea's to his Thought convey'd, / They by Degrees descended thro' the Air / To the sad Realms of Horrour and Despair; / The Walks of Death, and...

— Blackmore, Sir Richard (1654-1729)

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Date: 1723

"While shiv'ring Chillness seizes every Vein, / Slackens their Sinews and disturbs their Brain, / Which deep Impressions left of various Kind, / That pain the Body or afflict the Mind."

— Blackmore, Sir Richard (1654-1729)

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Date: 1723, 1740

"The strong Impression / May break my Heart, but shall not bend my Mind."

— Sheffield, John, first duke of Buckingham and Normanby (1647-1721)

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Date: 1723, 1740

"Our Tears and Grief will soften their hard Hearts, / Fit to receive Impression from our Words."

— Sheffield, John, first duke of Buckingham and Normanby (1647-1721)

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Date: 1723, 1740

"Not the most tempting Charms of Wit, or Worth, / Most graceful Forms, or dazling Shew of Greatness, / Can make Impression on a Mind like her's"

— Sheffield, John, first duke of Buckingham and Normanby (1647-1721)

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Date: May 6, 1736

"These first Characters therefore ought to be deeply and beautifully struck, and the Learning they express should be of great Price. And this, if timely Care be taken, may be done with ease because the Mind is then soft and tender: and because Truth and Right are by the nature of Things, as pleas...

— Denne, John (1693-1767)

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Date: Tuesday, August 7, 1750

"[T]hey seem always to be fully employed, or to be completely at ease without employment, to feel few intellectual miseries or pleasures, and to have no exuberance of understanding to lay out upon curiosity or caprice, but to have their minds exactly adapted to their bodies, with few other ideas ...

— Johnson, Samuel (1709-1784)

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Date: Tuesday, August 7, 1750

"But the images which memory presents are of a stubborn and untractable nature, the objects of remembrance have already existed, and left their signature behind them impressed upon the mind, so as to defy all attempts of rasure or of change."

— Johnson, Samuel (1709-1784)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.