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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"When the spirit brings light into our minds, it dispels darkness. We see it, as we do that of the sun at noon, and need not the twilight of reason to show it us."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"This light from heaven is strong, clear, and pure carries its own demonstration with it; and we may as naturally take a glow-worm to assist us to discover the sun, as to examine the celestial ray by our dim candle, reason."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"But when a cylindrical mirrour, placed right, hath reduced those irregular lines on the table into their due order and proportion, then the confusion ceases, and the eye presently sees that it is a man, or Caesar, i.e. that it belongs to those names; and that it is sufficiently distinguishable f...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"It is true the perception produced by demonstration is also very clear, yet it is often with a great abatement of that evident lustre and full assurance, that always accompany that which I call intuitive; like a face reflected by several mirrors one to another, where as long as it retains the si...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"For the natural tendency of the Mind being towards Knowledge; and finding if it should proceed by, and dwell upon only particular Things, its Progress would be very slow, and its Work endless: Therefore to shorten its way to Knowledge, and make each Perception the more comprehensive; the first T...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"If therefore we will warily attend to the Motions of the Mind, and observe what Course it usually takes in its way to Knowledge, we shall, I think, find that the Mind having got any Idea, which it thinks it may have use of, either in Contemplation or Discourse; the first Thing it does, is to abs...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Though God has given us no innate Ideas of himself; though he has stamped no original Characters in our Minds, wherein we may read his Being: yet having furnished us with those Faculties, our Minds are endowed with, he hath not left himself without witness: since we have Sense, Percepti...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"In the former case, our Knowledge is the consequence of the Existence of Things producing Ideas in our Minds by our Senses: in the latter, Knowledge is the consequence of the Ideas that are in our Minds whatsoever they are, and produce general certain Propositions, many whereof...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Not that I want a due respect to other Mens Opinions; but after all, the greatest reverence is due to Truth; and, I hope, it will not be thought arrogance, to say, That, perhaps, we should make greater progress in the discovery of rational and contemplative Knowledge, if we sought it in the Foun...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Such borrowed Wealth, like Fairy-money, though it were Gold in the hand from which he received it, will be but Leaves and Dust when it comes to use."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.