page 13 of 18     per page:
sorted by:

Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Would the pictures coming into such a dark room but stay there, and lie so orderly as to be found upon occasion, it would very much resemble the understanding of a man, in reference to all objects of sight, and the ideas of them"

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"And if these Organs, or the Nerves which are the Conduits, to convey them from without to their Audience in the Brain, the mind's Presence-room (as I may so call it) are any of them so disordered, as not to perform their Functions, they have no Postern to be admitted by; no other way to bring th...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"In all these cases, Ideas in the Mind, quickly fade, and often vanish quite out of the Understanding, leaving no more footsteps or remaining Characters of themselves, than Shadows do flying over fields of Corn; and the Mind is as void of them, as if they never had been there."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"The Dominion of Man, in this little World of his own Understanding, being muchwhat the same, as it is in the great World of visible things: wherein his Power, however managed by Art and Skill, reaches no farther, than to compound and divide the Materials, that are made to his Hand; but can do no...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

Surveying the "Powers of our own Minds" is like fathoming "the depths of the Ocean": "'Tis of great use to the Sailor to know the length of his Line, though he cannot with it fathom all the depths of the Ocean. 'Tis well he knows, that it is long enough to reach the bottom, at such Places as are ...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"When the Ideas that offer themselves, (for as I have observed in another place, whilst we are awake, there will always be a train of Ideas succeeding one another in our Minds,) are taken notice of, and, as it were, registred in the Memory, it is Attention."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"When Ideas float in our Mind, without any reflection or regard of the Understanding, it is that which the French call 'Resvery' [Reverie]; our Language has scarce a name for it."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"The floating of other mens Opinions in our brains, makes us not one jot the more knowing, though they happen to be true."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1691

"Trade is the very Life and Soul of the Universe, which, like the Vital Blood in the Body, Circulates to the Health, and well-being of the whole, and when by the failure of Industry, there is a stop put to Commerce, it often proves as fatal to the Body Politick, as the stagnating of the Blood doe...

— Blount, Thomas Pope, Sir (1649-1697)

preview | full record

Date: 1691

"And besides who knows but the Same Observation may hold true in Men, which is in Metals, That those of the strongest and noblest Substance, are hardest to be Polisht."

— Blount, Thomas Pope, Sir (1649-1697)

preview | full record

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.