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Date: 1788

"Miss Mowbray's heart is made of softer materials."

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)

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Date: 1788

"He had studied the characters of the two Miss Delameres, and found that of the eldest the fittest for his purpose; tho' the person of the youngest, and the pride which encased the heart of the other, would have made a less able politician decide for Augusta."

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)

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Date: 1788

" If therefore, my love, you really do not disapprove this young man, whose fortune is splendid, and of whose character I have received the most favourable accounts, I shall have a weight removed from my mind, and enjoy all the tranquillity I can hope for on this side the grave."

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)

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Date: 1788

"Of Delamere, she heard nothing; but imputing his silence to his frequent change of place, she conceived no anger against him on that account; and still felt herself bound to keep from her mind as much as possible the intrusive image of Godolphin."

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)

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Date: 1788

"Time, far from softening the asperity with which his thoughts dwelt on this supposed rival, seemed only to irritate and inflame his resentment; and ingenious in tormenting himself, he now added new anguish to that which corroded his heart, by supposing that Emmeline, aware of the danger which th...

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)

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Date: 1788

"Pensive, yet always kind; melancholy, and at times visibly unhappy; yet ever gentle, considerate, and attentive to me; always ready to blame himself for yielding to that despondence which he cannot without an effort conquer; trying to alleviate the anguish of my mind by subduing that which frequ...

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)

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Date: 1788

"Her engagement to Delamere, yet uncancelled, lay like a weight upon it, and seemed to impress the idea of her doing wrong while she thus listened to the praises of another; and felt that she listened with too much pleasure."

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)

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Date: 1788

"My Lord, my present concern is of a very different nature; and I do assure and protest to your Lordship that no time nor intreaties nor persuasion will erase and obliterate and wipe away from my mind, the injury and prejudice the parties have done me, by thus."

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)

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Date: 1788

"A change of circumstances so sudden; her apprehensions that the Marquis of Montreville, who she thought must have long known, should dispute her legitimacy, and her wonder at the concealment which Mr. Williamson and Mrs. Carey seemed passively to have suffered; which together with a thousand oth...

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)

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Date: 1788

"She now again relapsed almost into insensibility: for at the mention of Godolphin's having overtaken him, and having left him ill, a thousand terrific and frightful images crouded into her mind; but the predominant idea was, that it was on her account they had met, and that Delame...

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.