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Date: 1814

"That a girl of fourteen, acting only on her own unassisted reason, should err in the method of reform was not wonderful; and Fanny soon became more disposed to admire the natural light of the mind which could so early distinguish justly, than to censure severely the faults of conduct to which it...

— Austen, Jane (1775-1817)

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Date: 1814

"After being nursed up at Mansfield, it was too late in the day to be hardened at Portsmouth; and though Sir Thomas, had he known all, might have thought his niece in the most promising way of being starved, both mind and body, into a much juster value for Mr. Crawford's good company and good for...

— Austen, Jane (1775-1817)

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Date: 1814

"You should listen to me till you were tired, and advise me till you were tired still more; but it is impossible to put an hundredth part of my great mind on paper, so I will abstain altogether, and leave you to guess what you like.

— Austen, Jane (1775-1817)

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Date: 1814

"Fanny thought exactly the same; and they were also quite agreed in their opinion of the lasting effect, the indelible impression, which such a disappointment must make on his mind."

— Austen, Jane (1775-1817)

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Date: 1814

"He had suffered, and he had learnt to think, two advantages that he had never known before; and the self-reproach arising from the deplorable event in Wimpole Street, to which he felt himself accessary by all the dangerous intimacy of his unjustifiable theatre, made an impression on his mind whi...

— Austen, Jane (1775-1817)

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Date: 1816

"It darted through her, with the speed of an arrow, that Mr Knightley must marry no one but herself!"

— Austen, Jane (1775-1817)

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Date: 1816

"Her mind was divided between two ideas--her own former conversations with him about Miss Fairfax; and poor Harriet."

— Austen, Jane (1775-1817)

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Date: 1816

"While he spoke, Emma's mind was most busy, and, with all the wonderful velocity of thought, had been able--and yet without losing a word--to catch and comprehend the exact truth of the whole."

— Austen, Jane (1775-1817)

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Date: 1818

"Her plan for the morning thus settled, she sat quietly down to her book after breakfast, resolving to remain in the same place and the same employment till the clock struck one; and from habitude very little incommoded by the remarks and ejaculations of Mrs. Allen, whose vacancy of mind and inca...

— Austen, Jane (1775-1817)

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Date: 1818

"That she might not appear, however, to observe or expect him, she kept her eyes intently fixed on her fan; and a self-condemnation for her folly, in supposing that among such a crowd they should even meet with the Tilneys in any reasonable time, had just passed through her mind, when she suddenl...

— Austen, Jane (1775-1817)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.