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Date: 1605

"But from whatsoever root or cause this restiveness of mind proceedeth, it is a thing most prejudicial; and nothing is more politic than to make the wheels of our mind concentric and voluble with the wheels of fortune."

— Bacon, Sir Francis, Lord Verulam (1561-1626)

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Date: 1605

"This kind of degenerate learning did chiefly reign amongst the schoolmen, who having sharp and strong wits, and abundance of leisure, and small variety of reading, but their wits being shut up in the cells of a few authors (chiefly Aristotle their dictator) as their persons were shut up in the c...

— Bacon, Sir Francis, Lord Verulam (1561-1626)

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Date: 1605

"For the wit and mind of man, if it work upon matter, which is the contemplation of the creatures of God, worketh according to the stuff and is limited thereby; but if it work upon itself, as the spider worketh his web, then it is endless, and brings forth indeed cobwebs of learning, admirable fo...

— Bacon, Sir Francis, Lord Verulam (1561-1626)

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Date: 1605, 1640

"But the poets and writers of histories are the best doctors of this knowledge; where we may find painted forth, with great life, how affections are kindled and incited; and how pacified and refrained; and how again contained from act and further degree; how they disclose themselves; how they wor...

— Bacon, Sir Francis, Lord Verulam (1561-1626)

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Date: 1605, 1640

"But yet, nevertheless, secundum majus et minus, a man may revisit and descend unto the foundations of his knowledge and consent; and so transplant it into another, as it grew in his own mind."

— Bacon, Sir Francis, Lord Verulam (1561-1626)

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Date: 1605, 1640

"For it is in knowledges as it is in plants: if you mean to use the plant, it is no matter for the roots--but if you mean to remove it to grow, then it is more assured to rest upon roots than slips: so the delivery of knowledges (as it is now used) is as of fair bodies of trees without the roots;...

— Bacon, Sir Francis, Lord Verulam (1561-1626)

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Date: 1605, 1640

"For as the wronging or cherishing of seeds or young plants is that that is most important to their thriving, and as it was noted that the first six kings being in truth as tutors of the state of Rome in the infancy thereof was the principal cause of the immense greatness of that state which foll...

— Bacon, Sir Francis, Lord Verulam (1561-1626)

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Date: 1605, 1640

"Amongst the which this last is of special use in moral and civil matters; how, I say, to set affection against affection, and to master one by another; even as we used to hunt beast with beast, and fly bird with bird, which otherwise percase we could not so easily recover."

— Bacon, Sir Francis, Lord Verulam (1561-1626)

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Date: 1605, 1640

"For as in the government of states it is sometimes necessary to bridle one faction with another, so it is in the government within."

— Bacon, Sir Francis, Lord Verulam (1561-1626)

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Date: 1655

"Therefore it belongs to the will as to the Generall of an Army to moove the other powers of the soul to their acts, and among the rest the understanding also, by applying it and reducing its power into act."

— Bramhall, John (1594-1663)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.