page 6 of 77     per page:
sorted by:

Date: 1791, 1794

"[I]t cannot therefore be supposed that he wished Mrs. Crayton to be very liberal in her bounty to the afflicted suppliant; yet vice had not so entirely seared over his heart, but the sorrows of Charlotte could find a vulnerable part."

— Rowson, Susanna (1762-1828)

preview | full record

Date: 1791, 1794

"Such were the dreadful images that haunted her distracted mind, and nature was sinking fast under the dreadful malady which medicine had no power to remove."

— Rowson, Susanna (1762-1828)

preview | full record

Date: 1791, 1794

"'Oh,' said Charlotte, 'you are very good to weep thus for me: it is a long time since I shed a tear for myself: my head and heart are both on fire, but these tears of your's seem to cool and refresh it.'"

— Rowson, Susanna (1762-1828)

preview | full record

Date: 1791, 1794

"'I cannot believe it possible,' said Montraville, 'that a mind once so pure as Charlotte Temple's, should so suddenly become the mansion of vice."

— Rowson, Susanna (1762-1828)

preview | full record

Date: 1793

"For her own child, all the feelings of a parental bosom vegetated in luxuriance."

— Anonymous [By an American Lady]

preview | full record

Date: 1793

"Nothing is more luxuriant to a thinking mind than self approbation: It is a sun which dispels the clouds of solicitude and anxiety."

— Anonymous [By an American Lady]

preview | full record

Date: 1793

"If, with the 'mind's eye,' she had a taste to travel through distant kingdoms and take a retrospective view of past events, she might nourish that fondness for variety so predominant with human nature, and in the indulgence of this disposition be happy."

— Anonymous [By an American Lady]

preview | full record

Date: 1793

"Yet such is the construction of the human mind, that fear must be strongly imprest not to wear off by time."

— Anonymous [By an American Lady]

preview | full record

Date: 1793

"Such is the natural imbecility of the human mind, it confines us to the immediate scenes in which we are engaged, and as new objects present the past is in a degree erased from recollection."

— Anonymous [By an American Lady]

preview | full record

Date: 1793

"Mrs. Leason has one child, blessed with good natural abilities, and educated by a less indulgent parent, she might have shone in a domestic character, but when the idea is instilled in the youthful mind, that it is to be indulged in all its wishes, let the disposition be ever so pleasing, the so...

— Anonymous [By an American Lady]

preview | full record

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.