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Date: 1789?

The "placid current" of the mind may be bestorm'd so that "th' ideal billows, raging, rise"

— Williams, John [pseud. Anthony Pasquin] (1754-1818)

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Date: 1789?

The placid current of the mind may be bestorm'd so that "th' ideal billows, raging, rise"

— Williams, John [pseud. Anthony Pasquin] (1754-1818)

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Date: 1789?

" 'Tis thine to sprinkle manna o'er the mind"

— Williams, John [pseud. Anthony Pasquin] (1754-1818)

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Date: 1789?

" 'Tis thine to renovate the fancy's springs"

— Williams, John [pseud. Anthony Pasquin] (1754-1818)

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Date: 1789?

"If conscious Genius stamp their chosen breast, / And on the forehead show her seal impressed."

— Bowles, William Lisle (1762-1850)

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Date: 1789?

"Shorn of her beams and fetter'd by her thought, / The fallen nymph the caves of Sadness sought."

— Williams, John [pseud. Anthony Pasquin] (1754-1818)

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Date: 1789

"We have already hinted, that for the same, or similar reasons, none of the ordinary organs of sense are qualified to receive or communicate distinct impressions, till the brain, the common emporium of them all, has acquired those properties which must fit it for its arduous offices; and, as in t...

— Couper, Robert (1750-1818)

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Date: 1789

"Are there not causes enough to which the apparent inferiority of an African may be ascribed, without limiting the goodness of God, and supposing he forbore to stamp understanding on certainly his own image, because 'carved in ebony.'"

— Equiano, Olaudah [Gustavus Vasa] (c. 1745-1797)

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Date: 1789

"Does not slavery itself depress the mind, and extinguish all its fire and every noble sentiment?"

— Equiano, Olaudah [Gustavus Vasa] (c. 1745-1797)

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Date: 1789

"They [African customs] had been implanted in me with great care, and made an impression on my mind, which time could not erase, and which all the adversity and variety of fortune I have since experienced served only to rivet and record; for, whether the love of one's country be real or imaginary...

— Equiano, Olaudah [Gustavus Vasa] (c. 1745-1797)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.