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Date: 1761

"Human minds must be united to exert their greatest strength, and the united force of friendly souls, like that of the collateral bars of an artificial magnet, is incomparably greater than the sum of their separate forces."

— Rousseau, Jean-Jacques (1712-1778); Kenrick, William (1729/30-1779)

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Date: 1761

"This is thy triumph, celestial friendship! but what is even friendship itself, compared to that perfect union of souls, which connects the most perfect, the most harmonious amity, with ties an hundred times more sacred? where are the men whose ideas, gross as their appetites, represent the passi...

— Rousseau, Jean-Jacques (1712-1778); Kenrick, William (1729/30-1779)

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Date: 1761

"Abashed and confounded to find my humanity so far debased; to see myself fallen so low from that innate greatness of mind, to which our passion had reciprocally elevated us, I return home at night, with a heart swelling, yet vacant as a ball puffed up with air; sickened with disgust, and sunk in...

— Rousseau, Jean-Jacques (1712-1778); Kenrick, William (1729/30-1779)

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Date: 1761

"O, my Eloisa, were it possible for this talisman to affect your senses with the phrenzy and illusion of mine. But why is it not possible? why may not those impressions, which the mind darts forth with such rapidity, reach as far as Eloisa?"

— Rousseau, Jean-Jacques (1712-1778); Kenrick, William (1729/30-1779)

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Date: 1761

"I believe that spirits are invisible; but is it impossible that, between two lovers so closely united, there should be an immediate communication, independent of the body and the senses? may not their mutual impressions be transmitted through the brain?"

— Rousseau, Jean-Jacques (1712-1778); Kenrick, William (1729/30-1779)

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Date: 1761

"When I view my children and their father about me, I fancy that every thing breathes an air of virtue, and they banish from my mind the disagreeable remembrance of my former frailties."

— Rousseau, Jean-Jacques (1712-1778); Kenrick, William (1729/30-1779)

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Date: 1761

"Is it possible to have a long acquaintance with you without finding one's mind impressed with the charms of virtue, and the delights of friendship?"

— Rousseau, Jean-Jacques (1712-1778); Kenrick, William (1729/30-1779)

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Date: 1761

"Not but that, when you are the subject, one may perceive at the bottom of that susceptible mind, a certain tenderness, which friendship alone, though not less affecting, still expresses in a different manner; but I have long observed that it is impossible to see you, or to think of you with indi...

— Rousseau, Jean-Jacques (1712-1778); Kenrick, William (1729/30-1779)

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Date: 1761

"A veil of wisdom and honour makes so many folds about her heart, that it is impenetrable to human eyes, even to her own."

— Rousseau, Jean-Jacques (1712-1778); Kenrick, William (1729/30-1779)

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Date: 1761

"The design of nature is therefore evidently to strengthen the body, before the mind is exercised."

— Rousseau, Jean-Jacques (1712-1778); Kenrick, William (1729/30-1779)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.