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Date: 1698

"The meaning is, he suspects our Souls are nothing but Organiz'd Matter. Or in plain English, our Souls are nothing but our Bodies."

— Collier, Jeremy (1650-1726)

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Date: 1698

"He can't be assured the same Colours of Reason and Desire will last. Any little Accident from without may metamorphose his Fancy, and push him upon a new set of Thoughts."

— Collier, Jeremy (1650-1726)

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Date: 1698

"Every Change in Figure and Impulse, must alter the Idea, and wear off the former Impression. So that by these Principles, Friendship will depend on the Seasons, and we must look in the Weather Glass for our Inclinations."

— Collier, Jeremy (1650-1726)

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Date: 1698

"This Lady's fancy is just Slip-Stocking-high; and she seems to want Sense, more than her Breakfast."

— Collier, Jeremy (1650-1726)

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Date: 1698

"He is never lost in smoak and Rapture, nor overborn with Poetick Fury; but keeps his Fancy warm and his Reason Cool at the same time."

— Collier, Jeremy (1650-1726)

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Date: 1698

"But when Vice is varnish'd over with Pleasure, and comes in the Shape of Convenience, the case grows somewhat dangerous; for then the Fancy may be gain'd, and the Guards corrupted, and Reason suborn'd against it self."

— Collier, Jeremy (1650-1726)

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Date: 1698

"No body can be pleas'd without Sensible Impressions. Nor can such Perceptions be received without a Train of Passions attending them."

— Collier, Jeremy (1650-1726)

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Date: 1698

"A well work'd Poem is a powerful piece of Imposture: It masters the Fancy, and hurries it no Body knows whither.--If therefore we would be govern'd by Reason let us stand off from the Temptation, such Pleasures can have no good Meaning."

— Collier, Jeremy (1650-1726)

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Date: 1698

"This sort of Musick warms the Passions, and unlocks the Fancy, and makes it open to Pleasure like a Flower to the Sun."

— Collier, Jeremy (1650-1726)

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Date: 1698

"Now why should it be in the power of a few mercenary Hands to play People out of their Senses, to run away with their Understandings, and wind their Passions about their Fingers as they list?"

— Collier, Jeremy (1650-1726)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.