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Date: 1697

"Divers Names and Descriptions are given to it, but all may be reduc'd to this one Definition, That it is that Faculty of the Soul, anointed by our wise Creator to receive, retain and preserve the several Ideas convey'd into it by the Inlets of the Understanding, whether intellectual or sensitive."

— D'Assigny, Marius (1643-1717)

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Date: 1697

"All the Alarms and Troubles of the Soul blot out the Ideas that are already entertain'd, and hinder others from coming in. They obstruct all the Passages; and the Croud of thoughts that in such cases arise is a great hindrance to Memory."

— D'Assigny, Marius (1643-1717)

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Date: 1697

"As a Ship at Sea running swiftly thro the Waves, leaves behind a Track, which is almost as soon lost as made, so that no sign can be found of its Passage thro that fluid Element: So the moisture of the Brain may be susceptible of an Idea for the present, but 'tis not lasting, nor is there any si...

— D'Assigny, Marius (1643-1717)

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Date: 1697

"Let every thing we desire to remember, be fairly written and distinctly, and divided into Periods with large Characters in the beginnings for by this means we shall the more readily imprint the Matter and Words in our Minds, the more remarkable the Writing appears to the Eye."

— D'Assigny, Marius (1643-1717)

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Date: 1697

"Therefore Cicero tells us, in 3. de Oratore; Facilius ad ea qua visa sunt, quam adea qua auditasunt, Oculi Mentis feruntur: That the Eyes of the Understanding (and consequently of the Memory) are carried more easily to the things that are seen, than to those that are heard."

— D'Assigny, Marius (1643-1717)

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Date: 1697

" Let these Characters, or Beginnings of every Period, be well imprinted in our Minds, for they will quickly bring thither the whole Discourse also."

— D'Assigny, Marius (1643-1717)

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Date: 1697

"For this Similitude will certainly imprint the Thing or Person so in our Mind, that if we do casually forget, we shall the more easily recover the lost Idea; because the Idea that we have already in Memory, and that hath a resemblance and relation to that which is absent in some known Particular...

— D'Assigny, Marius (1643-1717)

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Date: 1697

"We may imprint in our Minds, and fix things in Memory, by thinking upon their Contraries or Opposites; and we may by the same means better remember things that are almost blotted out of our Imagination."

— D'Assigny, Marius (1643-1717)

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Date: 1698, 1751

"There is a natural and indelible Sence of Deity, and consequently of Religion, in the Mind of Man."

— Whichcote, Benjamin (1609-1683)

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Date: September 11, 1698

"For all the World acknowledges, that Hope and Fear are the two great Handles, by which the Will of Man is to be taken Hold of, when we would either draw it to Duty, or draw it off from Sin."

— South, Robert (1634-1716)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.