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Date: 1733-1735

"Various rude Arts the untaught Ancients knew / To fix Ideas e'er they fled away, / And Images of Thought to Sight convey. / Brass, Wax, or Wood the Characters retain'd, / Some liv'd on Slates, and some the Canvas stain'd; / Some trac'd in Iv'ry, or engrav'd on Stone, / Or sunk in Clay, e're Bi...

— Bowden, Samuel (fl. 1733-1761)

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Date: 1742 [see first edition, 1733]

"The Mind, like a Tabula rasa, easyly receives the first Impression; and, like that, when the first Impression is deeply made, it with Difficulty admits of an Erasement of the first Characters, which in some Minds are indelible"

— Cooke, Thomas (1703-1756)

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Date: 1733

"My head and heart thus flowing thro' my quill, / Verse-man or Prose-man, term me which you will."

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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Date: 1733

"Amurath himself was also in the Fleet, and and hearing that the Tunis Vessel was commanded by the Renegado Dragut, and that he had some young Men on board arm'd, and three Women, one of them an admirable Beauty, he made them all come on board his Ship. He presently knew Rosalinda, whose Picture ...

— Morando, Bernardo (1589-1656); Gaspard-Mo├»se-Augustin de Fontanieu; Anonymous

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Date: 1734

"The Memory is not only a Register of Tales, and Names, and Fictions, (the Materials of common Discourse) but may be called a Register of every thing that enters into the Senses and the Imagination."

— Forbes of Pitsligo, Alexander Forbes, Lord (1678-1762)

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Date: 1734

"The question is, how this Familiarity arises? and how the Cabinet comes to be sensible of any thing that's put into it? A Scritore knows nothing of the Papers which the careful Banker locks up in it? Or a Glass, tho' it may be said to receive the Image of a Beau, and he really sees somewhat of h...

— Forbes of Pitsligo, Alexander Forbes, Lord (1678-1762)

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Date: 1736

"It is the Opinion of a late ingenious Philosopher of our own Nation [Mr. Locke], and I think mankind are generally come into the same Way of thinking, 'That the Soul of Man is at first but a Tabula rasa, a Kind of fair unwritten Paper, till it has receieved Impressions form without, and i...

— Bernard, Thomas (1684/5-1755)

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Date: May 6, 1736

"Others, with equal truth and justice, have likened the Minds of Children to a rasa Tabula, or white Paper, whereon we may imprint, or write what Characters we please; which will prove so lasting, as not to be effaced without injuring or destroying the Beauty of the whole."

— Denne, John (1693-1767)

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Date: May 6, 1736

"These first Characters therefore ought to be deeply and beautifully struck, and the Learning they express should be of great Price. And this, if timely Care be taken, may be done with ease because the Mind is then soft and tender: and because Truth and Right are by the nature of Things, as pleas...

— Denne, John (1693-1767)

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Date: 1736, 1743

In youth "Fancy's mimick Pow'r is warm and strong, / Engraving deeply, and retaining long"

— Wesley, Samuel, the Younger (1691-1739)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.